One wish

“What is one thing you wish people could understand about your epilepsy?”

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One thing I wish people could understand is that the medication can be just as bad as having epilepsy. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) help reduce the probability of a seizure occurring by reducing and alternating the excessive electrical activity (or degree of excitability) of neurons. Note that different AEDs work in different ways and have  different effects on the brain. Some AEDs may affect how neurotransmitters send messages or how fast the connection is. The medication I am on currently, as many of you may know, is levetiracetam/Keppra. The best part about Keppra is that they have NO idea how exactly this medication works on the brain – but it does not behave like a typical AED. All they know is that it forces brain cells to fire more slowly to prevent a seizure from occurring. Keppra is still, in comparison, fairly new and still needs more research.

Since my AED slows the brain down completely, I feel this is why my memory and comprehension is so greatly affected. It takes me a while now to understand things and this becomes extremely frustrating. I have trouble recalling things which can become embarrassing. I also have issues with getting words I want to say from my brain to my mouth – granted I did have two (well, three I suppose) events to the head that were considered traumatic and this could be why – I still feel that Keppra may be more to blame. I also wish people would understand that the brain fog we feel is real and comes along with AEDs and Epilepsy.


What is Brain Fog?

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       Brain Fog is not a medically used term, but does sum up what most of us feel from time to time or on an everyday basis. Symptoms usually include: irritability, low energy or fatigue, trouble concentrating, forgetfulness, memory problems, anxiety, confusion, low motivation, mild depression, and trouble sleeping at night. I can definitely vouch and say I feel this way daily but not everyone will. AEDs effect everyone differently but it is good to research and know what to expect. Is it manageable? Yes, for some people. You just need to give yourself time and make proper accommodations. But if you feel that this is unmanageable, talk to your doctor. There may be an underlying cause or a better solution.


Stop and Think

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       Before you start bantering at someone who is taking longer than normal to speak, write, or do a task. Stop and think. Do you see a medical alert bracelet? Do you know this person personally? Haven you had a conversation with them? They might be someone with epilepsy or they might be someone with an illness or disorder that cause similar symptoms to the ones listed above. Please remember to be patient with people; for we all have our own journeys and battles that go unnoticed.

 


More Information

For more information or information on your specific medication, check out:

Feel free to leave comments on your experiences or about how AEDs effected people you know, love, or care for

9 comments

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