Seizures In Public

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“Where am I? How did I get here?” – does this sound familiar? What do you after you had a seizure in public. “Did anyone notice? What do I do now?” Here are some quick tips on dealing with Epilepsy and Seizures in public


Before a Seizure

  • Medical Alert ID: If your seizures come without warning, are frequent in nature, or you become disorientated and confused for a while after a seizure – it would be beneficial to invest in a medical alert band. This way if anything does happen in a public place, you will have some basic information in visible sight. Information usually includes: you name, your condition, medication(s), and an emergency contact. If you have rescue medication – may place that as well.
  • Spare Medication: If you are unsure whether you will be back in time for your next dose or a chance you may stay elsewhere for the night – bring extra medication. This is your first line of defense against a seizure and you should always be prepared. Sometimes we do not know who we will run into or where exactly we are going so having at least one extra dose on us can be beneficial.
  • Rescue Medication: Carry your rescue medication (if prescribed), wherever you go. You never know what may happen or what may send you off. Be sure to have specific directions along with it or on an index card in a med-pack or a bag that you use so others may administer it to you in an event of an emergency.
  • Eat, drink, and sleep: Sometimes we get busy and tend forget about our basic needs. Sometimes we may think “well, I can wait until the next meal.” Before going out, be sure you have ate something, are staying hydrated, and have plenty of rest – especially if you have a long night ahead of you. Of course, if you are going out to dinner or lunch, you do not want to have a full course meal but be sure you have had a little snack at some point beforehand. This will help increase your seizure threshold, meaning it will make it harder for seizure activity to occur, and help keep you going strong. You need to give your body and brain the best possible chance.
  • Bring a med-pack/First aid kit: It does not have to be anything major and tailor it to your specific type of seizures. See here for what is in my med-pack if you need help getting started – reminder: this is tailored towards me and I made it more on the universal side. I have tonic-clonic seizures without auras, therefor I prepare for injury. I do not wet myself or lose control of my bowels, therefor I did not state packing extra clothes. It depends on your specific situation.
  • Auras: If you have auras; do not ignore. If something does not feel right, take the warning. Whether this means going back home or finding a less stimulating area – do so. Do so in a place where you can get low to the ground and away from objects if possible to promote personal safety. If your seizures do not involve convulsing – still do find a less stimulating place to relax and try to keep as calm as possible.
  • Go out in pairs: If you have frequent seizures; there is no harm in making sure you have someone to go out with you. While yes, this can be annoying you, it is a matter of your health and safety. If you just feel “off,” when you usually do not or know that you have not gotten a lot of sleep and that is a trigger – do not be afraid to phone a friend or family member to tag along with you.
  • Call/Text: If you are going out alone, let someone know where you are going. If you feel off, call or text someone so there is a time frame of reference and someone will be aware of where you are in case of an emergency.

After a Seizure

  • Disoriented and Confused: If you have no idea where you are or who is around you; do not panic. Take in some deep breaths, try to relax, and ask someone what happened. If there is no one around – take time to relax and slowly reorient yourself. Try to remember the last thing you were doing or place you have been. Check recent texts, calls, and even receipts to see what you can remember last.
  • Phone a friend: If a seizure had just occurred, it may be beneficial to call a friend to accompany you, pick you up, or simply talk you through your postictal phase. This friend may be able to help reorient you and will be able to help you track your seizure.
  • Check for injuries: If you are alone, check yourself for injuries. If someone is with you, if you feel comfortable have them also check. You want to make sure no harm was done and assess if medical attention is advised.
  • How long was I out for? If you do not know or do not have a frame of reference – call your neurologist if it is during regular office hours. If it is late at night, assess yourself or have someone else assess you. There is no harm in taking a visit to the ER or walk-in if you are unsure but not all seizures may require medical attention immediately. Regardless, phone your physician or specialist as soon as you can so they are aware or if you have a plan to document occurrence, just do as your care plan states.
  • Do not drive: Right after a seizure had occurred, I strongly suggest to not drive yourself home. Ask a family member or friend to come meet you to either pick you up. You may have enough assistance where someone else could drive your car home; if not, talk to the security of the facility you are located at or manager on what to do with your vehicle. I am sure they will be understanding and if anything, call your local police department. They would rather you be safe than attempting to drive home
  • Rest: Take your time, take things slow – do things at your own pace. When you get the chance, be sure to rest. It can be stressful having a seizure out in public, especially by yourself. For myself, when I have a seizure alone, it leaves me uneasy with a lot of unanswered questions and this may happen if no one is with you during the time you come to. Just remind yourself: you are safe, you are alive, and you are doing okay.

Gaining independence from Epilepsy can be hard, but is doable with the right support system. Never give up hope

What if you are the friend/family present during the seizure? What if you were a stranger walking by? Do you know what to do? Check  here