Purple Day 2017 – Don’t Fear the Purple

Purple Day was started in 2008 by a nine-year-old in Canada by the name of Cassidy Megan. This is a day that those with Epilepsy and those who support us come together and spread awareness. This day is observed globally each year on March 26th to show support for our fellow warriors. While Epilepsy can be a wild ride and sometimes intimidating, know that you are not alone. Here is a a little reflection of my journey with Epilepsy and with a quick search of #PurpleTogether, you can find other inspirational stories about those who travel a very similar road.

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Th Beginning of a Journey

I was 19-years-old when I was first diagnosed with Epilepsy, which was six years ago this year. I was a performer with InProv Winter guard, switching into a new college, violist for New Bedford Youth Symphony, and heading out with friends every weekend without a care in the world. Then out of left field, all of that changed – worst part is, I cannot even remember what happened.

Last memory of that day prior was going to a cookout with my friends from InProv and taking a quick stop at Target – next thing I remember, I am in a hospital bed with my friends’ staring horrified and my father just arriving. I had no idea what hospital I was in, what time or day it was, why I was there, could not recall names, and slowly I began to panic.

When I was finally proved to be alert and oriented, the doctor came in to explained what happened. My friends then started stating what they witnessed and at that moment everything was a daze. I remember my dad’s face turning pale, my friends’ were still in shock – now what? I was told I had a seizure in my friend’s car, while she was driving. She immediately pulled over and called 9-1-1 and luckily a nurse pulled over to aid me and them through my first seizure. I had blood coming from my nose, convulsing uncontrollably, completely unconscious, and let out a scream before the event took place. My tongue was currently swollen, I could not remember even getting back into the car and at least an hour or two had passed and I do not remember anything since being inside of Target, which was 20-30 minutes before the seizure. My behavior was fine, I acted normal, then suddenly I screamed and everything took place. The doctor stated I experienced a grand mal/Tonic-clonic seizure. Then quickly reassured me that it was probably a fluke…at least so he thought.

I continued life as normal, of course my parents were quite hesitant. Both my brothers had seizures, although only in early childhood. I grew up around having to help my parents care for them and the painful wait for paramedics. I was already well aware of this life, but their seizures were not like mine – and that was concerning; this normality became unfamiliar. Then about a month later, it happened again.

I was in the bathroom, last I remember I had just entered the bathroom. I was told I let out this scream that you could not  ignore. The dogs started going crazy and my parents began trying to unlock the door. I bet you could guess what happened; I was seizing in the shower. My dad worked on the door while my mom called 9-1-1; they had no extent of my injuries or if I was submerged in water. Paramedics arrived and my dad went with them and yet again, my next memory is waking up in the hospital – but it was different. I did not feel like I was all there. I was way more groggy and confused. I remember my dad pleading with the nurse to not leave me alone as she sent me for a urine sample. I asked her if I should leave the door open, to which she stated I did not have to – I would not have another seizure. 19-year-old me who was desperately grasping for independence shut and locked that door because of that RN told me. Well, guess who again let out that scream in a locked bathroom? Guess how many security guards came to knock that door down? Guess who then got placed in a medical induced coma?

(Once I woke up from my slumber)

A bit over 12 hours later, I finally woke up to my friends and parents surrounding me. I guess they have been there a while, they all took a deep breath in to see me open my eyes. I was convinced it was still the previous day, my dad opened the windows and everyone kept telling me it was a new day. My dad told me what happened in the ER after I went to the bathroom.  He was upset and angry, he knew as soon as a code was called, it was for me. I just sat there, staring at my hands and the wires thinking, this is now my life. This was not going away, this was not a fluke – this is now my life.

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The Sun still Shines

For quite some time, it felt like Epilepsy did nothing but slow me down. My memory has worsened over the years, I can not work as much as I would like, I interfered with my children’s sense of security, I almost lost my own life, and I am no longer graduating with my peers. But in the grand scheme, things were not all that bad. For every negative, there is a positive – you just have to look for it.

Met my wonderful Partner – His name is Adam. He looked passed my diagnosis, accepted the fact I was a single mother trucking through school and working a basic job. When the seizures came, he stood by me and took us in as well as his family, just so I could rest even if my stubbornness fought hard against that. He reminds me that I am only human, that I am still like anyone else. For someone with Epilepsy, sometimes that is exactly what we need to hear. We are people too. Even with my waning memory, he is patient with me and even aids me. He is a reminder that I am safe and I am not alone. When my medication side affects decide to take over, and I will never forget this, he held me. He reminded me this is not me and he knows that. He reminded me that no matter what, we will get through this and we will get me. For the first time, someone understood. He understood. I will never let that memory fade.

Friendships Grow – I have made some wonderful friends through Epilepsy – whether it was through support groups or becoming close to those around me already. There is one person I would like to mention specifically, that is my long-time friend, Maria. She may not know it, but she did pull be out of a spiral. After my accident in 2016, I was lost – I worked very hard for 4 years to be told I could no longer continue because of something I cannot control. My daughters’ would cry every time I left the house thinking I would not come back or come back in blood as I did that time. My partner was worried about me when I would not respond – as that is what happened shortly before the seizure. I had a lot of guilt that became depression – I also had anxiety flaring up alongside it. Maria stood by me, she listened, and she pulled me up – probably unknowingly. She got me back into music which was a huge outlet for me growing up, she made more of an effort to check in, she came by now and then, and she brought me back into reality. There is a lot I never say out loud, but she still understood. I could never thank her enough

Passion for Pediatric Nursing Grew – I always liked pediatrics, but I had an amazing experience in Maternity and though perhaps that was my calling- until pediatrics. I will not forget the amount of children there for their first seizure or had been diagnosed with Epilepsy already. These children were afraid, theses families thought of it as a dead end, and in that moment, I imagined my family. I remember being in their shoes, just older. I took time with these patients, one patient I walked with around the halls just talking about Epilepsy and our seizures. They were grateful, they had hope, they saw a light – and I will not forget that. If I could instill that in more people, I could never complain about my job. In that moment, I found my calling.

Family Growth – Although, I hate to admit my girls may of had to grow up quick in some aspects and I see it every day in my oldest. Once they were able to grasp that mommy had “accidents” (what they term seizures), they had never left my side. My oldest does not like the idea of me sleeping alone, she sleeps besides me when my partner is not there. My youngest watches and reminds me to take my medication, she even learned which bottles were which. They grew interested in the medical field, my youngest always dressing up as a doctor during play time. My oldest is always hugging me and reminding me that “it’s okay mommy,” and I have her. Each moment we truly cherish, even at their young ages. While yes, I have a lot of guilt their first memory will be mommy being unconscious and convulsing, I am thankful for the bond that formed.

Meeting Fellow Warriors– It took me a while before I started seeking support from others with Epilepsy that may be around my age. For a long time, I wanted nothing to do with my condition and wanted it to just go away. I went through being made of, losing my independence, losing my license, almost losing my job, and feeling like I was incapable of functioning on my own. That was far from the truth in reality, but at that time, that felt like my reality. I struggled alone for quite some time, then I finally found support within a group and a girl I met online. Along with others we formed our own support group and it has been nothing but a blessing. We are able to be there for others so they do not have to struggle alone and we are there for each other when we go through times of darkness.

Gaining Self-Confidence – I chuckle when I reflect on how Epilepsy gave me confidence after turning me into a hermit. I was at a low that no one quite realized, but as I grew with Epilepsy – I started to gain confidence and resiliency. I became determined to not let it stop my ability as a mother, student, partner, and musician. I became determined to prove that I can still take care of myself and work. I stopped listening to the negativity that surrounded me. I wanted to be more than my illness, I wanted to be me. Of course, I understand all of this is still within limitation, but I can still have a fulfilling life.

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Remember, you are never alone

At the end of the day, at this present time, Epilepsy is here to stay for most of us. Whether it is having seizure or the side affects from medication and repeated trauma, it will be part of us forever. We must learn to embrace it and spread awareness in hope that one day, there will be a cure. Embracing Epilepsy can be hard, but you are never alone. Take a look at the #PurpleDayProject – support came in from the United States, to the United Kingdom, to Austria, and back again. There are support groups for just about every country and region. There are support groups online, in person, and wonderful medical professionals out there who will help you along your journey. You are never alone.

Your journey is what makes you,  you. We will have bad days, and we will have good days – that is human nature. It is okay to not be okay, it is okay to wish for a different path. Just remember, you are here because you are a warrior. You are strong and you are reliant. You did not  choose to give up, even if you were on the brink of making that decision.  Cherish the moments of happiness and embrace the moments of sadness with positivity.

You will prevail.

Promise.

Fear of Permanence

A fear that I did not know existed within me.  I do not like change too much either within my personal life, but permanence terrifies me. This fear for me rises from anxiety with the idea that good and pleasant things will fall through. It also rises from a fear that I will not be able to change something I do not enjoy – but instead, find a way to make it mediocre.

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Epilepsy is permanent. Have you ever imagined waking up one day, knowing you will never get better? Imagine being told that at 19, just a few months into being diagnosed with something completely out of left field. There is no magic pill to erase it, just to tolerate it. There is no guaranteed surgery or interventions. All you have is hope. To hope it gets better, to hope it becomes tolerable, and to hope it will not be your downfall. Coping with the permanence of Epilepsy is exhausting. For some, yes – they do “grow out” of it and able to live a normal life; very common for childhood diagnosis depending on the type. Some live completely seizure free with medication. Some do have success with surgery. Then there are some that may have less seizures, but they still come. And for the unfortunate few, nothing helps.

Even if we are not actively seizing, we still suffer. Epilepsy does not end when the seizure ends. For myself, head trauma is included every single time accompanied by blackouts and lost memories. With each seizure the time to recover is longer and lack of memory worsens. Then let us not forget the pills that lessen these events – they slow down cognition processes and understanding. They too affect memory storage. Then there are the mental health side; both condition and medicine induced. Sometimes we lose ourselves for the sake of tolerable life.

This is permanent for most of us. This is permanent for myself. There is no reversal; my memory will not come back. Memories lost will need to be triggered and constantly triggered to reform them. Without medication my learning processes may improve, but will equally be hindered by seizure frequency. Perhaps the constant seizures would have a worse effect. My family has been permanently affected and opportunities are forever missed. This is our reality.

  • “Epilepsy affects more people than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s combined – yet receives fewer federal dollars per patient than each of these” (source)
  • “The overall risk of dying for a person with epilepsy is 1.6 to 3 times higher than for the general population” (source)
  • “Epilepsy-related causes of death account for 40% of mortality in persons with epilepsy” (source)
  • “Neurologists say sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is second to stroke as a cause of years of life lost because of a neurological disorder” (source)
  • Tonic-clonic seizures are an important proximate cause of SUDEP” (source)
  • SUDEP takes more lives annually in the United States than sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).” (source)
  • Perspective wise: 47,055 people died in 2014 from drug overdoses of various types and 35,398 from motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. (source). Epilepsy takes 50,000 lives each year (source).

These are permanent facts we have to live with every single day. These facts have not changed and without support and awareness, will not see a change. All we can do is hope and confine in those close to us in our times of weakness.

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March 26th is Purple Day; a day in which we must raise awareness for Epilepsy. A day in which we must take a moment to realize that such a common phenomenon is underfunded and takes lives without notice. We deserve more than mediocracy.

Wear your purple with pride

 

 

 

Embarrassment and Humility: Taking Control

Epilepsy comes in many different forms and strike us in many ways. Some people have auras, which allows them to feel when a seizure is coming on. Some people, like myself, have no idea when a seizure is coming until you wake up in a hospital bed not knowing what day it is or who is around you. But something we can all to relate to on at least one occasion is having a seizure in public. No matter what type of seizure, it can be humiliating, embarrassing, or overwhelming for that person. We all have our own ways with dealing with these type of situations, but here are some tips, tricks, and methods to get you through the post seizure madness.

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Looking at our emotions

Some people may report feelings of embarrassment, humiliation, or feelings of being overwhelmed after a seizure. To help better ourselves and ease these feelings, we must understand where these feelings may arise. Embarrassment itself is a very self-conscious emotion. No one else will experience this emotion but you and not everyone will experience it in the same manner. Embarrassment usually arises from someone feeling as though they failed to act appropriately socially, a sense of guilt or shame, and a feeling as though their guard was let down and their pride was hurt. It tends to be triggered in social situations, like having a seizure in public.  It is also a very socially connected emotion.

In my opinion, having a seizure is a very vulnerable state. You lose control of your body, your thoughts, and your surroundings. You no longer can protect or shield yourself; you can no longer care for yourself and well-being. Your body is just there, on display, for some undetermined amount of time, without you having any control. This can be very overwhelming and trigger a range of emotions. But luckily, there are different ways to deal our feelings.

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Remember: Take Control

How do you take a control when you completely lost control of yourself in front of a crowd of people? People are social and emotional creatures, they will mimic what you project after a traumatic event more often than not. One way to take control is by changing the mood of the situation. One way to do this is by displaying confidence. People will ease their tension and divert attention when they see that you are aware of what is going on and show a level of competency. Everyone will have their own way of taking control of their situation and easing the fears of those around them; another example would be through laughter. While yes, why should you have to worry about how those around you feel; you will find that being able to break the tension and having a sense of control in the smallest ways will help ease your feelings of embarrassment. Even if you only start with taking control of your own thoughts after a seizure, in due time, you will be able to apply it to the masses.

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Laughter

Laughter is the best medicine While yes, there is nothing funny about having Epilepsy or a seizure, laughter can be used as a coping mechanism. If a seizure was to occur around friends or with someone whom you are close and comfortable with, try making light of the situation. I have heard some people say “yeah sorry, my brain malfunctioned” or “what do you mean, you do not pee yourself too?” While this can be very hard for some people to poke some fun at, especially early on in a diagnosis, some people find this a way to deescalate the tension and worry within those around them.

When people see you crack a smile or treat a situation in a relaxed manner, they also tend to relax – seeing it as not an emergent situation. They tend to stop trying to overcompensate for your feelings by being overly concerned and overbearing. Some people want their space after a seizure – a good way to make someone feel safe and give you that space is to make the situation light. This does not have to be directly through laughter of course, one could just simply explain, “oh this happens a lot, nothing new” then point out a positive in the situation. That person or the surrounding people will see that you are handling the situation in a positive way, therefore make it easier for them to feel positive about you.

 How to apply to self: You can apply these methods on a personal level to. Take a moment to lighten the situation from within whether it is through laughter, pointing out positives, or simply telling yourself “here we go again, I got this.” Be positive, be uplifting – you are doing amazing.

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Education

Education? Who is in the mood to give a lecture on Epilepsy and seizures after having one? Probably no one, but there are some beneficial factors for giving a brief synapse of your condition or type of seizures to those around you. Quite similar to what I mentioned in laughter, it helps people ease up and feel confident in your ability to care for yourself. It eases the tension and in return will help you feel less embarrassed or overwhelmed due to being moved out of the spotlight.

Have you ever noticed that nurses tend to give a sigh of relief when they know you have a history of seizures? They are able to make the mood lighter for you and give you the proper time that you need. Aside from the fact that it is probably less work on their behalf, they have confidence that you know what to do to care for yourself. This diverts attention away from you and allows you to reconnect with yourself. This is even more true for the everyday average Joe. If you can show off your knowledge, their attention will go elsewhere and ease the feelings of embarrassment.

 How to apply to self: Remind yourself, you know yourself and your condition best. You know what to do; you know how to manage your seizures. Boost your confidence through what you know. You are a smart cookie, and a tough one at that!

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Getting Answers

Sometimes we get embarrassed when we do not know how things were perceived. The unknown can be quite scary and in the realm of Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders, that unknown realm can be our best unfortunate friend. Finding answers gives us a sense of security and helps us feel calm. Sometimes after a seizure, you need to do just that. Ask what happened, ask who was around, do not be afraid to approach people. You may not see it in the moment, but they want to help – most just do not know how. They are willing to answer and be there for you. They are not passing judgement; although it may feel that way because we did something atypical, yet typical for us. Gain control by getting answers and making the unknown known. You will have a better sense of realizing how people actually feel and that the situation was not as bad as you think.

 How to apply to self: If you are uncomfortable with approaching people, ground yourself. Look at yourself, feel what hurts, see how much time has passed, think of the lease severe seizure you had. Try to answer your own questions by observation and feelings, give yourself that validation that it really was not as bad as you thought. Let yourself breathe.

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Moving Forward

This may be easier said then done for some. How do you just “move on” from having a seizure and becoming what you perceive as a public spectacle?  First, take a moment and breathe. Ground yourself to the present, remind yourself that you are okay. Collect your thoughts and feelings and when you are ready, move one. Literally and figuratively. Just get right back up and keep moving forward. Thank those around you for their help and support, reassure them that you are okay, and walk away like it never happened.

Now, this may require quite a bit of practice and the “fake it till you make it” theory, but there is no reason to linger on something that is not making you feel good. Let your mind move forward, do not dwell on what happened or could have happened, do not put all your focus on the seizure itself – at this moment focus on yourself and your well-being. You are safe, you are secure. This will also no longer make the seizure the focal point. When people see you moving on, they know it is safe for them to move on too. When people see your bravery, even if you must fake it at first, they will be brave for you. You have a lot more control than you think.

 How to apply to self: While even doing this on a personal level only may be difficult, just give it a shot. Let your mind go. Do not get wrapped up on focusing on the seizure and the event, focus on the now and go from there. Prioritize your safety and find comfort in knowing you are still here, you still have a pulse, you still have life left in you. You can get through this, you will get through this. Redirect your attention and focus elsewhere

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Forgive Yourself

You may not feel like you are mad at yourself or that you are blaming yourself, but on a deeper level, that just may be the root cause Even if it is not the situation for you specifically, still take the time to remind yourself, this is part of you – this is NOT you. Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders do not control you or your life. It may try for 5 minutes or maybe even 10-20 minutes, but remember, you are a fierce warrior and you will take your life and time right back and hold onto it longer than it ever could. We cannot control every aspect of our life, with or without seizures – unexpected things will happen, but if we can make peace with ourselves, we are one step ahead.

You are a Warrior.

Keep strong.

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Looking for how to handle with Seizures in Public?

Click the link below!

http://thestorminsidemyhead.com/2016/10/seizures-in-public/

 

A Very Special Announcement

It has been some length of time since I last stopped by, I am sure this may lead to some of you wondering why. Well, between being a student and working, I have been blessed once more with a beautiful gift; I am expecting baby number three! As you may know, I have previously blogged about Epilepsy and Pregnancy (click here to take a peek); now I will be able to post my experience as I go along and answer questions in real time. I hope this helps some of you who are thinking about pregnancy, are currently pregnant, or are curious about pregnancy and Epilepsy.

 

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Wait, how long have you known? Why the wait?!

Truthfully, I found out back in November. I had the inkling that I was pregnant due to an increase in nocturnal seizures (which is typical for me and typical for some others to have an increase in seizure activity due to hormones). We were indeed actively trying due to other health circumstances that have been bestowed upon me. These health circumstance will impact my ability to carry children and sadly this will have to be my last pregnancy for the sake of my health. This time around, I was actively seeing an ob/gyn due to the circumstances and began taking folic acid at 4mg and prenatal vitamins before conceiving, as well as continuing with my B6, fish oil, and Keppra. During this time my Keppra dose also seen an increase due to being diagnosed with myoclonic seizures – which did aid in decreasing the frequency of these seizures. In due time, I had one large nocturnal seizure, noticed a huge decline in myoclonic jerks, and soon enough seen a positive pregnancy test. My partner and I could not be any more thrilled as we welcome a new child into our life.

Currently, I am 18 weeks and 1 day and due date is still set for August 1st, 2017. I wish I could say it has been smooth sailing, but we had some bumps early on. While my health issues reproductive wise do pose a threat, I was also diagnosed with a fairly large subchronic hemorrhage (abbreviated as SCH), also known as a subchronic hematoma. A SCH is an accumulation of blood between the fetal membrane, next to the placenta or between the uterus and the placenta itself. It can cause light to heavy spotting, but some women have no bleeding at all.  SCHs typically tend to affect 25% of all women in the first half of pregnancy and will typically resolve on their own. Unfortunately there is no direct cause or way to prevent this from occurring; it is one of those events that “happen” and is due to the egg slightly separating or tearing from the uterus. Sometimes you will also hear it referred to as a threatened miscarriage – as yes, there is a possibility for a miscarriage to occur.

(Photo pulled from Google as an example; for reference my SCH was the size of the gestational sac)

Thankfully enough, when my bleeding start I was at work and the ER was just downstairs. I tried my best to remain positive when I saw the blood, but as it got heavier, thoughts rushed back from my first miscarriage. I could not shake it, I could not bear going through it again. Unfortunately, and realistically, I knew there was nothing I could do but hope. So that is what I did, I kept faith and hoped. Soon enough I had an ultrasound, I was relieved to see the heartbeat. The bleeding had slowed so I assumed everything was going to be okay. Not the case. The doctor came in and explained the fetal heart rate was quite low and to expect a miscarriage within the week. My heart sank. It sank even harder because everything seemed okay. Everyone told me not to worry, everything looked fine. Moments later, here came the doctor to rain on my parade. I broke down immediately. I could not believe what I was hearing. The flicker I just saw would soon be blown out, yet again.

With a heavy heart I went home to await my early meeting with my new found life. I did exactly what I was told: rest, stay on pelvic rest, hydrate, and try to relax. Easier said than done, but I did just that. My ob/gyn did a follow up, that whole week seemed to drag. To my surprise, there was the flicker with a healthy heart beat. S/he proved the ER doctor wrong; they were holding on. Unfortunately the SCH was still there, but all that mattered was that flicker.

Due to this, I chose to delay announcing. I did not feel comfortable explaining to everyone if a negative event occurred. Around this time, I was still having nocturnal seizures (which is atypical for me) and did not feel like I was going to have a positive outcome. But here I am, with my little one snug inside, telling you my story.

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What about your Seizures?

As of lately, I had not experienced any tonic-clonic or myoclonic seizures. Although, I have experienced a couple more nocturnal and this is becoming concerning as usually all forms stop during pregnancy. To be fair, I did work more than my recommended amount due to missing days. Now I am back on my normal schedule and things have been fine.

I will not lie and say I have not had any anxiety building up as I approach the halfway mark. In my other blogs, I talk about some scary episodes where I had seizures and very well could of compromised my children’s life. This is the unfortunate reality of those who wish to parent and live with Epilepsy. Due to this anxiety, I am starting to look into seizure alert watches as well as requirements for a service dog. I do not think I will meet the requirements for a service dog realistically, but hopefully a watch will be reliant enough. My partner will also be moving in, which will be in itself a huge help and makes me feel safer. As he says “we’re in this together.” I also started to do yoga again and music helps as well with unwinding. I will do everything in my power to keep my family safe – even if it is from my own condition.

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               Doing anything different this time around?

Aside from the fact I was more proactive with folic acid and other supplements and intend to invest in a seizure alert system – I am planning on giving breastfeeding a chance. This will be a completely new experience that again, raises some anxiety. Since the birth of my first child and being strongly advised not to breastfeed while on Keppra, I have been following research carefully. With my second child, it was a more “up to you” response when I approached health professionals, so this time I dug as deep as I possibly could. One site stated that during lactation, doses up to 3500 mg daily produce low levels in breast milk and would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants (https://www.drugs.com/breastfeeding/levetiracetam.html). Luckily, I am under that quota at 2000 mg daily so it would be considered relatively safe by those standards. However, the infant will need to be monitored or drowsiness, weight gain, and developmental milestones as a precautionary. Although, in my case, my children were monitored for this regardless due to being on Keppra during pregnancy. If you have not had children yet, doctors may use the wording “sleepy baby” to describe babies born to mothers on Keppra. Babies tend to sleep more, are drowsy, and/or be more calm than those not born to Keppra mothers.

In another study in 2005, results yielded that levetiracetam does transfer into the mother’s milk, but does not pose any risk or harm to the infant due to very low serum levels. These serum levels were actually lower than what was found in the umbilical cord, therefore breast milk contains less than what the infant was originally receiving (https://www.ncbi.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1363376) . A 2013 study that was published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics also supports this claim if the dose is below 3000mg a day (or 3g a day as the study states; https://ijponline.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1824-7288-39-50), it will pose no harm to the infant .

You will find sites stating to not take Keppra while breastfeeding and this may become concerning. Unfortunately, the reason for this is due to lack of studies to completely verify Keppra as safe. You can equally find an number of testimonies of women who breastfed on Keppra and their child having no complications. I suggest talking to your ob/gyn/midwife as well as your neurologist. Often, we have to see a maternal-fetal specialist who you may also ask. From my personal experience, they could never give me an actual answer other than it being my choice. Although, after doing research as well as seeing other mothers who have been through it, I have decided in my circumstance that the benefits outweigh the risks.

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Do you have any information you would like to share?

Any questions you may having regarding Epilepsy and Pregnancy?

Leave a comment below!