Embarrassment and Humility: Taking Control

Epilepsy comes in many different forms and strike us in many ways. Some people have auras, which allows them to feel when a seizure is coming on. Some people, like myself, have no idea when a seizure is coming until you wake up in a hospital bed not knowing what day it is or who is around you. But something we can all to relate to on at least one occasion is having a seizure in public. No matter what type of seizure, it can be humiliating, embarrassing, or overwhelming for that person. We all have our own ways with dealing with these type of situations, but here are some tips, tricks, and methods to get you through the post seizure madness.

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Looking at our emotions

Some people may report feelings of embarrassment, humiliation, or feelings of being overwhelmed after a seizure. To help better ourselves and ease these feelings, we must understand where these feelings may arise. Embarrassment itself is a very self-conscious emotion. No one else will experience this emotion but you and not everyone will experience it in the same manner. Embarrassment usually arises from someone feeling as though they failed to act appropriately socially, a sense of guilt or shame, and a feeling as though their guard was let down and their pride was hurt. It tends to be triggered in social situations, like having a seizure in public.  It is also a very socially connected emotion.

In my opinion, having a seizure is a very vulnerable state. You lose control of your body, your thoughts, and your surroundings. You no longer can protect or shield yourself; you can no longer care for yourself and well-being. Your body is just there, on display, for some undetermined amount of time, without you having any control. This can be very overwhelming and trigger a range of emotions. But luckily, there are different ways to deal our feelings.

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Remember: Take Control

How do you take a control when you completely lost control of yourself in front of a crowd of people? People are social and emotional creatures, they will mimic what you project after a traumatic event more often than not. One way to take control is by changing the mood of the situation. One way to do this is by displaying confidence. People will ease their tension and divert attention when they see that you are aware of what is going on and show a level of competency. Everyone will have their own way of taking control of their situation and easing the fears of those around them; another example would be through laughter. While yes, why should you have to worry about how those around you feel; you will find that being able to break the tension and having a sense of control in the smallest ways will help ease your feelings of embarrassment. Even if you only start with taking control of your own thoughts after a seizure, in due time, you will be able to apply it to the masses.

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Laughter

Laughter is the best medicine While yes, there is nothing funny about having Epilepsy or a seizure, laughter can be used as a coping mechanism. If a seizure was to occur around friends or with someone whom you are close and comfortable with, try making light of the situation. I have heard some people say “yeah sorry, my brain malfunctioned” or “what do you mean, you do not pee yourself too?” While this can be very hard for some people to poke some fun at, especially early on in a diagnosis, some people find this a way to deescalate the tension and worry within those around them.

When people see you crack a smile or treat a situation in a relaxed manner, they also tend to relax – seeing it as not an emergent situation. They tend to stop trying to overcompensate for your feelings by being overly concerned and overbearing. Some people want their space after a seizure – a good way to make someone feel safe and give you that space is to make the situation light. This does not have to be directly through laughter of course, one could just simply explain, “oh this happens a lot, nothing new” then point out a positive in the situation. That person or the surrounding people will see that you are handling the situation in a positive way, therefore make it easier for them to feel positive about you.

 How to apply to self: You can apply these methods on a personal level to. Take a moment to lighten the situation from within whether it is through laughter, pointing out positives, or simply telling yourself “here we go again, I got this.” Be positive, be uplifting – you are doing amazing.

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Education

Education? Who is in the mood to give a lecture on Epilepsy and seizures after having one? Probably no one, but there are some beneficial factors for giving a brief synapse of your condition or type of seizures to those around you. Quite similar to what I mentioned in laughter, it helps people ease up and feel confident in your ability to care for yourself. It eases the tension and in return will help you feel less embarrassed or overwhelmed due to being moved out of the spotlight.

Have you ever noticed that nurses tend to give a sigh of relief when they know you have a history of seizures? They are able to make the mood lighter for you and give you the proper time that you need. Aside from the fact that it is probably less work on their behalf, they have confidence that you know what to do to care for yourself. This diverts attention away from you and allows you to reconnect with yourself. This is even more true for the everyday average Joe. If you can show off your knowledge, their attention will go elsewhere and ease the feelings of embarrassment.

 How to apply to self: Remind yourself, you know yourself and your condition best. You know what to do; you know how to manage your seizures. Boost your confidence through what you know. You are a smart cookie, and a tough one at that!

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Getting Answers

Sometimes we get embarrassed when we do not know how things were perceived. The unknown can be quite scary and in the realm of Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders, that unknown realm can be our best unfortunate friend. Finding answers gives us a sense of security and helps us feel calm. Sometimes after a seizure, you need to do just that. Ask what happened, ask who was around, do not be afraid to approach people. You may not see it in the moment, but they want to help – most just do not know how. They are willing to answer and be there for you. They are not passing judgement; although it may feel that way because we did something atypical, yet typical for us. Gain control by getting answers and making the unknown known. You will have a better sense of realizing how people actually feel and that the situation was not as bad as you think.

 How to apply to self: If you are uncomfortable with approaching people, ground yourself. Look at yourself, feel what hurts, see how much time has passed, think of the lease severe seizure you had. Try to answer your own questions by observation and feelings, give yourself that validation that it really was not as bad as you thought. Let yourself breathe.

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Moving Forward

This may be easier said then done for some. How do you just “move on” from having a seizure and becoming what you perceive as a public spectacle?  First, take a moment and breathe. Ground yourself to the present, remind yourself that you are okay. Collect your thoughts and feelings and when you are ready, move one. Literally and figuratively. Just get right back up and keep moving forward. Thank those around you for their help and support, reassure them that you are okay, and walk away like it never happened.

Now, this may require quite a bit of practice and the “fake it till you make it” theory, but there is no reason to linger on something that is not making you feel good. Let your mind move forward, do not dwell on what happened or could have happened, do not put all your focus on the seizure itself – at this moment focus on yourself and your well-being. You are safe, you are secure. This will also no longer make the seizure the focal point. When people see you moving on, they know it is safe for them to move on too. When people see your bravery, even if you must fake it at first, they will be brave for you. You have a lot more control than you think.

 How to apply to self: While even doing this on a personal level only may be difficult, just give it a shot. Let your mind go. Do not get wrapped up on focusing on the seizure and the event, focus on the now and go from there. Prioritize your safety and find comfort in knowing you are still here, you still have a pulse, you still have life left in you. You can get through this, you will get through this. Redirect your attention and focus elsewhere

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Forgive Yourself

You may not feel like you are mad at yourself or that you are blaming yourself, but on a deeper level, that just may be the root cause Even if it is not the situation for you specifically, still take the time to remind yourself, this is part of you – this is NOT you. Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders do not control you or your life. It may try for 5 minutes or maybe even 10-20 minutes, but remember, you are a fierce warrior and you will take your life and time right back and hold onto it longer than it ever could. We cannot control every aspect of our life, with or without seizures – unexpected things will happen, but if we can make peace with ourselves, we are one step ahead.

You are a Warrior.

Keep strong.

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