Fear of Permanence

A fear that I did not know existed within me.  I do not like change too much either within my personal life, but permanence terrifies me. This fear for me rises from anxiety with the idea that good and pleasant things will fall through. It also rises from a fear that I will not be able to change something I do not enjoy – but instead, find a way to make it mediocre.

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Epilepsy is permanent. Have you ever imagined waking up one day, knowing you will never get better? Imagine being told that at 19, just a few months into being diagnosed with something completely out of left field. There is no magic pill to erase it, just to tolerate it. There is no guaranteed surgery or interventions. All you have is hope. To hope it gets better, to hope it becomes tolerable, and to hope it will not be your downfall. Coping with the permanence of Epilepsy is exhausting. For some, yes – they do “grow out” of it and able to live a normal life; very common for childhood diagnosis depending on the type. Some live completely seizure free with medication. Some do have success with surgery. Then there are some that may have less seizures, but they still come. And for the unfortunate few, nothing helps.

Even if we are not actively seizing, we still suffer. Epilepsy does not end when the seizure ends. For myself, head trauma is included every single time accompanied by blackouts and lost memories. With each seizure the time to recover is longer and lack of memory worsens. Then let us not forget the pills that lessen these events – they slow down cognition processes and understanding. They too affect memory storage. Then there are the mental health side; both condition and medicine induced. Sometimes we lose ourselves for the sake of tolerable life.

This is permanent for most of us. This is permanent for myself. There is no reversal; my memory will not come back. Memories lost will need to be triggered and constantly triggered to reform them. Without medication my learning processes may improve, but will equally be hindered by seizure frequency. Perhaps the constant seizures would have a worse effect. My family has been permanently affected and opportunities are forever missed. This is our reality.

  • “Epilepsy affects more people than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s combined – yet receives fewer federal dollars per patient than each of these” (source)
  • “The overall risk of dying for a person with epilepsy is 1.6 to 3 times higher than for the general population” (source)
  • “Epilepsy-related causes of death account for 40% of mortality in persons with epilepsy” (source)
  • “Neurologists say sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is second to stroke as a cause of years of life lost because of a neurological disorder” (source)
  • Tonic-clonic seizures are an important proximate cause of SUDEP” (source)
  • SUDEP takes more lives annually in the United States than sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).” (source)
  • Perspective wise: 47,055 people died in 2014 from drug overdoses of various types and 35,398 from motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. (source). Epilepsy takes 50,000 lives each year (source).

These are permanent facts we have to live with every single day. These facts have not changed and without support and awareness, will not see a change. All we can do is hope and confine in those close to us in our times of weakness.

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March 26th is Purple Day; a day in which we must raise awareness for Epilepsy. A day in which we must take a moment to realize that such a common phenomenon is underfunded and takes lives without notice. We deserve more than mediocracy.

Wear your purple with pride

 

 

 

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