Epilepsy Med-Pack

       Always be prepared

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I was greatly inspired by my good friend Tori on making an Epilepsy Toolkit. After my recent accident and knowing that if it was not for a firefighter being involved; there is no promise I would have been as well off as I was. Then I started thinking some more – what if I am able to drive again and get into an accident while having a seizure? What if I saw someone else having a seizure (this has happened before)? I decided to take the next step.

This is my Med-pack; essentially a first aid kit tailored to your liking. I found these nifty little bags at a local Rite Aid and they had coupons inside for things that one might buy. Here is the run down on my version of the Epilepsy Toolkit.


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  • Note book and pen – that might be silly as someone having a seizure may or may not be able to communicate. But timing a seizure is very important! When an emergency situation occurs, it may be hard to remember dates and times while tending to someone so take a second and write it down! This is very beneficial for the person you are helping, their medical provider, and for you! Remember: After 5 minutes call an ambulance – or if there is no medical alert ID can be found.
  • Alcohol wipes and gloves (latex free preferably) – For me personally, I have tonic-clonic seizures that come without warning. So yes, I will fall and usually there is blood. If someone else was bleeding I would also wanted gloves and something to clean their wound with. If you are making your own first-aid kit or med-pack be sure to use latex free gloves. You never know who will be helping YOU in an emergency and you do not want two emergencies going on at once
  • Bandages of all sizes – Some people with epilepsy will hurt themselves and bandages can become quite useful!
  • Butterfly closures – okay, so some of you might be like “what in the world is that” (see picture below). It helps hold skin in pace for small wounds that might need more than a bandage. If you think someone might need stitches, slap a butterfly closure on them until help arrives

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  • Gauze pads of various sizes – This is mostly because of my car accident and seeing the mass amounts of blood everywhere. If someone is bleeding a lot, these will be more beneficial to you. If you needed to set yourself up a little field to lay things out, hey gauze pads work for that too. Also, if someone is puking and you want to give them a little bib, gauze pads can help
  • Paper tape – I say paper tape over cloth tape because it is easier on the skin and less chance of a reaction to occur. If you need to tape gauzes to someone or something is not sticking well, use the paper tape
  • Tissues – Some of us may foam at the mouth, drool, or vomit so it is helpful to have these laying around.
  • Scissors – not every day kitchen shears but something you would see in the medical field. If someone is seizing and the clothing around them is too tight – use scissors!
  • Antibiotic Ointment – for those wound that bandages would fix up. The more you can help clean out wounds the better to decrease the risk of infection.
  • Hair tie – if someone seriously injured their face or part of their head you would want to get hair out of there or if the person is vomiting.
  • Survival Wrap – okay, this coming in handy probably sounds very slim as a wrap but it is meant to help prevent heat loss. Well, if you are waiting for an ambulance in the winter this actually could be very helpful. But it is also super reflective and could be used to warn oncoming traffic or grab attention. This can also be used as shade and prevent over exposure to the sun. I just had this in my house and hey, you never know

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     I got lucky and my medical ID came with its own little pouch. It has the medical alert symbol on it and in there I placed an index card with my full name, date of birth, emergency contact(s), diagnosis, type(s) of seizures, list of medications, name of my neurologist, types of insurance I have, when to call an ambulance, where my med-pack is located and a brief run through of epilepsy first aid. I always have my insurance cards on me as well as a picture ID so I do not worry about placing them in there. I also listed my children’s names on the card in case they were ever with me. I carry this pouch everywhere with me and I will bring the med-pack if I am traveling.

This might seem a little over the top (did I mention I am a nurse in training?) but after my experiences with Epilepsy I would rather be over than under prepared. Also, this can be used for just about any situation and it is always just a good idea to have something similar with you in your car or on your travels. I hope this was able to help some of you out and maybe have some of you start your own med-pack.


Did I forget anything?

Feel free to leave a comment below on what you think should be included. Also, check out Victoria’s Epilepsy Toolkit here and see what she has: https://chroniclesofkeppra.wordpress.com/2016/09/11/the-epilepsy-toolkit/

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