Fear of Permanence

A fear that I did not know existed within me.  I do not like change too much either within my personal life, but permanence terrifies me. This fear for me rises from anxiety with the idea that good and pleasant things will fall through. It also rises from a fear that I will not be able to change something I do not enjoy – but instead, find a way to make it mediocre.

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Epilepsy is permanent. Have you ever imagined waking up one day, knowing you will never get better? Imagine being told that at 19, just a few months into being diagnosed with something completely out of left field. There is no magic pill to erase it, just to tolerate it. There is no guaranteed surgery or interventions. All you have is hope. To hope it gets better, to hope it becomes tolerable, and to hope it will not be your downfall. Coping with the permanence of Epilepsy is exhausting. For some, yes – they do “grow out” of it and able to live a normal life; very common for childhood diagnosis depending on the type. Some live completely seizure free with medication. Some do have success with surgery. Then there are some that may have less seizures, but they still come. And for the unfortunate few, nothing helps.

Even if we are not actively seizing, we still suffer. Epilepsy does not end when the seizure ends. For myself, head trauma is included every single time accompanied by blackouts and lost memories. With each seizure the time to recover is longer and lack of memory worsens. Then let us not forget the pills that lessen these events – they slow down cognition processes and understanding. They too affect memory storage. Then there are the mental health side; both condition and medicine induced. Sometimes we lose ourselves for the sake of tolerable life.

This is permanent for most of us. This is permanent for myself. There is no reversal; my memory will not come back. Memories lost will need to be triggered and constantly triggered to reform them. Without medication my learning processes may improve, but will equally be hindered by seizure frequency. Perhaps the constant seizures would have a worse effect. My family has been permanently affected and opportunities are forever missed. This is our reality.

  • “Epilepsy affects more people than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s combined – yet receives fewer federal dollars per patient than each of these” (source)
  • “The overall risk of dying for a person with epilepsy is 1.6 to 3 times higher than for the general population” (source)
  • “Epilepsy-related causes of death account for 40% of mortality in persons with epilepsy” (source)
  • “Neurologists say sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is second to stroke as a cause of years of life lost because of a neurological disorder” (source)
  • Tonic-clonic seizures are an important proximate cause of SUDEP” (source)
  • SUDEP takes more lives annually in the United States than sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).” (source)
  • Perspective wise: 47,055 people died in 2014 from drug overdoses of various types and 35,398 from motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. (source). Epilepsy takes 50,000 lives each year (source).

These are permanent facts we have to live with every single day. These facts have not changed and without support and awareness, will not see a change. All we can do is hope and confine in those close to us in our times of weakness.

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March 26th is Purple Day; a day in which we must raise awareness for Epilepsy. A day in which we must take a moment to realize that such a common phenomenon is underfunded and takes lives without notice. We deserve more than mediocracy.

Wear your purple with pride

 

 

 

Possible Precursor to Epilepsy

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There is not much of a surprise when you hear Epilepsy and Psychiatric Disorders are connected. People would expect that due to receiving the diagnosis or if there was a structural abnormality that may interfere with the brain’s normal processing. There has been a lot of research showing a clear comorbidity between the two. A thought I have always held onto and had not looked into further was if psychological conditions could serve as precursors to Epilepsy. A member reached out to me personally asking if I could do a little research which ended up dabbling into my own questions. I will present to you quick synapses and links to research articles that may make you begin to ask questions.


 

  • Schizophrenia-like Psychosis and Epilepsy: The Status of the Association

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9501741

Date: 1998 (yes, technically deemed outdated – but for reference purposes)

What is it saying: Epilepsy may be related to schizophrenia-like psychosis due to structural brain abnormalities (e.g. cortical digenesis or diffuse brain lesions). Seizures may modify the presentation pf psychosis and psychosis may modify the presentation of seizures.

  • Bidirectional Relation Between Schizophrenia and Epilepsy: A population-based Retrospective Cohort Study

Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2011.03268.x/full

Date: September 19, 2011

What is it saying: Incidence of Epilepsy is higher in those with Schizophrenia and Schizophrenia patients have a higher incidence of Epilepsy. Thus, the two conditions may share a common cause

  • The Secondary Schizophrenias

Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/9781444327298.ch9/summary

Date: March 08, 2011

What is it saying: Epilepsy may/can cause Schizophrenic-like signs and symptoms which can lead to Schizophrenia-like psychosis

  • Schizophrenia Like Psychosis in Patients with Epilepsy Case Report

Source: http://www.ucms.com.np/journals/vol2/SCHIZOPHRENIA%20LIKE%20PSYCHOSIS%20IN%20PATIENTS%20WITH%20EPILEPSY%20CASE%20REPORT.pdf

Date: 2013

What is it saying: Epilepsy and Schizophrenia are both due to altered cerebral functioning and their history is often connected. Focuses on generalized tonic-clonic seizures presenting with schizophrenia-like symptoms

  • Recurrent Schizophrenia-like Psychosis as First Manifestation of Epilepsy: A Diagnostic Challenge in Neuropsychiatry

Source: https://www.dovepress.com/recurrent-schizophrenia-like-psychosis-as-first-manifestation-of-epile-peer-reviewed-article-NDT

Date: May 03, 2010

What is it saying: Studies have been done on Schizophrenia-like psychoses in Epilepsy since 1950s. It has been well documented that Epilepsy may be associated with psychotic disorders but, less widely recognized that the relapsing psychotic phenomena may be the first and only symptom of Epilepsy. This case study was focused on two patients specifically with an initial diagnosis of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenic Psychosis. Treatment began using more epileptic tactics and during a follow-up, patients were free of Epilepsy and psychotic symptoms.

  • Epilepsy, Suicidality, and Psychiatric Disorders: A Bidirectional Association

Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ana.23601/full

Date: August 07, 2012

What is it saying: Psychosis, depression, and anxiety significantly increase before Epilepsy diagnosis and after as well as one year after diagnosis. This shows that an underlying pathophysiological mechanism seen in both that lowers the seizure threshold and increases risk for psychiatric disorders

  • Hospitalization for Psychiatric Disorders Before and After the Onset of Unprovoked Seizures/Epilepsy

Source: http://www.neurology.org/content/78/6/396.short

Date: January 25, 2012

What is it saying: The risk of developing an unprovoked epileptic seizure is highest less than 2 years before and up to 2 years after a first psychiatric diagnosis (includes: depression, bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety disorders, and suicide attempts). Higher prevalence with those having depression and psychosis.


Wait, what does this all mean?

While yes, this is open for individual interpretation to some degree – you cannot deny there is a strong correlation between psychiatric conditions and psychosis with Epilepsy. At times, it appears this may be the initial or only sign of Epilepsy and could serve as a precursor to an eventual epileptic diagnosis for some people. Unfortunately, there is a gap between psychiatry and neurology that may allow some people to fall between the lines to be conveniently pushed into one section or another. I believe that this is what also makes Psychogenetic Non-Epileptic Seizures (PNES) so difficult and avoided. What if PNES is a soft-name for a precursor to  Epilepsy? What if we can catch Epilepsy through psychiatric disorders before the onset of a seizure? For me, this has opened up a lot of questions and I hope it made you think too. If you feel as though your psychiatric diagnosis does not quite fit your situation, do not be afraid to question your doctor. If you feel as though your PNES may be more epileptic, again, question them. Of course, this situation may not be for everyone, but questions get answered. Don not be afraid, advocate!


What are your thoughts or opinions? Did this get you thinking?

Share in the comments below!