A Very Special Announcement

It has been some length of time since I last stopped by, I am sure this may lead to some of you wondering why. Well, between being a student and working, I have been blessed once more with a beautiful gift; I am expecting baby number three! As you may know, I have previously blogged about Epilepsy and Pregnancy (click here to take a peek); now I will be able to post my experience as I go along and answer questions in real time. I hope this helps some of you who are thinking about pregnancy, are currently pregnant, or are curious about pregnancy and Epilepsy.

 

_________________________________________________________________

Wait, how long have you known? Why the wait?!

Truthfully, I found out back in November. I had the inkling that I was pregnant due to an increase in nocturnal seizures (which is typical for me and typical for some others to have an increase in seizure activity due to hormones). We were indeed actively trying due to other health circumstances that have been bestowed upon me. These health circumstance will impact my ability to carry children and sadly this will have to be my last pregnancy for the sake of my health. This time around, I was actively seeing an ob/gyn due to the circumstances and began taking folic acid at 4mg and prenatal vitamins before conceiving, as well as continuing with my B6, fish oil, and Keppra. During this time my Keppra dose also seen an increase due to being diagnosed with myoclonic seizures – which did aid in decreasing the frequency of these seizures. In due time, I had one large nocturnal seizure, noticed a huge decline in myoclonic jerks, and soon enough seen a positive pregnancy test. My partner and I could not be any more thrilled as we welcome a new child into our life.

Currently, I am 18 weeks and 1 day and due date is still set for August 1st, 2017. I wish I could say it has been smooth sailing, but we had some bumps early on. While my health issues reproductive wise do pose a threat, I was also diagnosed with a fairly large subchronic hemorrhage (abbreviated as SCH), also known as a subchronic hematoma. A SCH is an accumulation of blood between the fetal membrane, next to the placenta or between the uterus and the placenta itself. It can cause light to heavy spotting, but some women have no bleeding at all.  SCHs typically tend to affect 25% of all women in the first half of pregnancy and will typically resolve on their own. Unfortunately there is no direct cause or way to prevent this from occurring; it is one of those events that “happen” and is due to the egg slightly separating or tearing from the uterus. Sometimes you will also hear it referred to as a threatened miscarriage – as yes, there is a possibility for a miscarriage to occur.

(Photo pulled from Google as an example; for reference my SCH was the size of the gestational sac)

Thankfully enough, when my bleeding start I was at work and the ER was just downstairs. I tried my best to remain positive when I saw the blood, but as it got heavier, thoughts rushed back from my first miscarriage. I could not shake it, I could not bear going through it again. Unfortunately, and realistically, I knew there was nothing I could do but hope. So that is what I did, I kept faith and hoped. Soon enough I had an ultrasound, I was relieved to see the heartbeat. The bleeding had slowed so I assumed everything was going to be okay. Not the case. The doctor came in and explained the fetal heart rate was quite low and to expect a miscarriage within the week. My heart sank. It sank even harder because everything seemed okay. Everyone told me not to worry, everything looked fine. Moments later, here came the doctor to rain on my parade. I broke down immediately. I could not believe what I was hearing. The flicker I just saw would soon be blown out, yet again.

With a heavy heart I went home to await my early meeting with my new found life. I did exactly what I was told: rest, stay on pelvic rest, hydrate, and try to relax. Easier said than done, but I did just that. My ob/gyn did a follow up, that whole week seemed to drag. To my surprise, there was the flicker with a healthy heart beat. S/he proved the ER doctor wrong; they were holding on. Unfortunately the SCH was still there, but all that mattered was that flicker.

Due to this, I chose to delay announcing. I did not feel comfortable explaining to everyone if a negative event occurred. Around this time, I was still having nocturnal seizures (which is atypical for me) and did not feel like I was going to have a positive outcome. But here I am, with my little one snug inside, telling you my story.

________________________________________________________________

What about your Seizures?

As of lately, I had not experienced any tonic-clonic or myoclonic seizures. Although, I have experienced a couple more nocturnal and this is becoming concerning as usually all forms stop during pregnancy. To be fair, I did work more than my recommended amount due to missing days. Now I am back on my normal schedule and things have been fine.

I will not lie and say I have not had any anxiety building up as I approach the halfway mark. In my other blogs, I talk about some scary episodes where I had seizures and very well could of compromised my children’s life. This is the unfortunate reality of those who wish to parent and live with Epilepsy. Due to this anxiety, I am starting to look into seizure alert watches as well as requirements for a service dog. I do not think I will meet the requirements for a service dog realistically, but hopefully a watch will be reliant enough. My partner will also be moving in, which will be in itself a huge help and makes me feel safer. As he says “we’re in this together.” I also started to do yoga again and music helps as well with unwinding. I will do everything in my power to keep my family safe – even if it is from my own condition.

________________________________________________________________

               Doing anything different this time around?

Aside from the fact I was more proactive with folic acid and other supplements and intend to invest in a seizure alert system – I am planning on giving breastfeeding a chance. This will be a completely new experience that again, raises some anxiety. Since the birth of my first child and being strongly advised not to breastfeed while on Keppra, I have been following research carefully. With my second child, it was a more “up to you” response when I approached health professionals, so this time I dug as deep as I possibly could. One site stated that during lactation, doses up to 3500 mg daily produce low levels in breast milk and would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants (https://www.drugs.com/breastfeeding/levetiracetam.html). Luckily, I am under that quota at 2000 mg daily so it would be considered relatively safe by those standards. However, the infant will need to be monitored or drowsiness, weight gain, and developmental milestones as a precautionary. Although, in my case, my children were monitored for this regardless due to being on Keppra during pregnancy. If you have not had children yet, doctors may use the wording “sleepy baby” to describe babies born to mothers on Keppra. Babies tend to sleep more, are drowsy, and/or be more calm than those not born to Keppra mothers.

In another study in 2005, results yielded that levetiracetam does transfer into the mother’s milk, but does not pose any risk or harm to the infant due to very low serum levels. These serum levels were actually lower than what was found in the umbilical cord, therefore breast milk contains less than what the infant was originally receiving (https://www.ncbi.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1363376) . A 2013 study that was published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics also supports this claim if the dose is below 3000mg a day (or 3g a day as the study states; https://ijponline.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1824-7288-39-50), it will pose no harm to the infant .

You will find sites stating to not take Keppra while breastfeeding and this may become concerning. Unfortunately, the reason for this is due to lack of studies to completely verify Keppra as safe. You can equally find an number of testimonies of women who breastfed on Keppra and their child having no complications. I suggest talking to your ob/gyn/midwife as well as your neurologist. Often, we have to see a maternal-fetal specialist who you may also ask. From my personal experience, they could never give me an actual answer other than it being my choice. Although, after doing research as well as seeing other mothers who have been through it, I have decided in my circumstance that the benefits outweigh the risks.

________________________________________________________________

Do you have any information you would like to share?

Any questions you may having regarding Epilepsy and Pregnancy?

Leave a comment below!

Relationships and Epilepsy

getty_rf_twofinger

My Experience

“Five years with Epilepsy, you must of went through a lot!” You are right, but not in this department. I have had two relationships from my diagnosis till now and hopefully no more (hint hint, haha). Relationships can be hard and difficult for the average person, but what about dating someone with Epilepsy?

When I first got diagnosed with Epilepsy, it was the right before the start of a new relationship. I was struggling to accept the diagnosis at this point, hiding it from everyone I could and only telling those who had to know. So when I started dating this new fellow, I was not sure what to say or how he would even react. Well good thing for me I did not have to tell him; I actually had a tonic-clonic seizure right in front of him within a week of dating. Thankfully, he kind of knew what to do and we were at his house with a few mutual friends. I eventually came to and I still remember how pale his face was. I must have had a dazed look as I struggled to recognize the faces around me. He started pointing to our friends asking their name and then pointed to himself and I remember yelling out “some dude that I’m dating…I don’t know, I can’t remember, but I know I am dating you” (this became a running joke between us for a while). The next morning, we had a little chat about Epilepsy and my seizures. He was intrigued and concerned, but reinforced me that it was okay and he wished I told him sooner. He willingly drove me to and from work so I could keep my job, let me sleep at his house so it would be a shorter drive and I could have more sleep, and wrote me notes every day when my memory started to fail me. Now I cannot say he was always this sweet. Eventually the epilepsy became a common occurrence before it was under controlled. Side effects from the medication had put stress on our relationship as well as welcoming two children. The pregnancies actually triggered seizures as well as stopped my seizures and that was a terrifying and stressful time. We eventually went our separate ways for very good reasons. Although, one reason on my behalf involved my Epilepsy but that is a story for a different time.

Now with my second and current relationship, things were little different.  I was now a single mother with Epilepsy and in college. To me, I felt like this was already a lot of baggage to be bringing someone. I was always very open and not afraid to tell people I had children at the age of 22. I told him that right off the bat without a care. They were my world. But when it came to epilepsy I hesitated. He already took one suitcase, can he really take another? My seizures were controlled at the time and not frequent. When I went to tell him I made sure to emphasize that part and he was not fazed by it. He told me how he had family in the medical field and he actually went into telling me about his medical problems. It was actually really nice and he made me feel accepted.  It was a while into dating before I had a friendly reminder that I have Epilepsy, but it occurred in my sleep while we were apart. I dreaded telling him but I did the following day. He asked if the girls were okay and told me we would have a relaxing weekend together. A few months later I had another nocturnal, I had always had my myoclonic jerks, and then I finally had my typical tonic-clonic seizure while bathing the girls. This is when he started to really worry.  He worried with the others too and with every jerk, but the severity of the tonic-clonics and the what-ifs worried him more. This was his first experience with my typical seizures. I went on to having a nocturnal again the beginning of this year and he begged me to get a new neurologist as I was fighting to see the one I had at the time. Eventually the next tonic-clonic hit and sent me into a brick wall. That was it for me. I went right to a neurology clinic and got seen the following week.

Now this has put some stress overtime on our relationship. He was constantly worried about me as I still had driving privileges prior. He would be sure to text me and I would be sure text him that I was okay and made it to where I had to go. He would call me every night and every morning. He told me about the day I crashed my car a little later; “I didn’t hear from you that you got to your friend’s house and I started to worry, but then I told myself ‘she’s probably busy studying, she’s always alright’ and you weren’t. I still feel awful. I love you” and tears fell from both of our faces as I never truly understood he was so worried. I typically try to push Epilepsy to the back of my mind. It was not until my pediatric rotation I started to be a little more open and it was not until the accident that I truly stopped caring about judgement with coming forward. This is our reality and people needed to know.


My Boyfriend’s Perspective

You having Epilepsy did not bother me, that does not make you any different. I think the hardest part is the side effects of the medication; I noticed the difference as soon as you started them. It can be stressful. Yeah, I worry every day that something is going to happen to you or that could potentially die; but I know that can be avoided. With the medication, I do not know how to help you with your side effects. I am not sure what to do sometimes. Epilepsy itself does not make you different.


So what do I do?

Be honest – First and foremost always be honest, and tell them BEFORE a seizure happens. If they truly love you or want to be with you, they will want to be with you no matter what. If their opinion changes of you after you tell them you have epilepsy, do you really want to be with someone like that? You deserve better, much better, and there will be better out there for you. You do not need someone like that in your life.

Take the time to explain – Do not just walk up to your partner or potential partner and tell them you have Epilepsy and walk away. Sit down with them and explain to them the type of seizures, the frequency, what they should do for you, and what the medication you take is and potential side effects from them. This will help alleviate their stress and give you a peace of mind. Also, if you ever had a seizure in front of them they would be well prepared in knowing what to do and this could help give them a sense of confidence about your condition. I know it may sound overwhelming but honestly if they are a good person and are right for you, they would listen because they care.

Do not settle – I did not quite mention this but there was a point in my first relationship where I settled. I literally said to myself “who else would want me, I have Epilepsy.” I had a hard time accepting the diagnosis myself and did not have very good experiences with telling others. I felt like no one would ever accept me, so how could they possibly attempt to love me. But trust me, they will, someone will – I promise.

Take care of yourself – Sometimes we do need help, other times we do not. But knowing a seizure could happen without warning can be a stressor for both of you. Be sure to take care of yourself first! Take your medication, avoid triggers when possible, go to your regular appointments, and be on top of your care. This will allow your partner to relax and let you relax too knowing you are doing your very best to prevent a seizure from occurring.

Do not let Epilepsy stop you – Do not feel like you are any less deserving of dating or a good relationship just because you have Epilepsy. You can still go out, you can still enjoy yourself, and you can still enjoy the company of others. You are just the same as everyone else – you are beautiful, you are deserving, and you are amazing.


But wait, when do I tell them?

There is no set time limit on when to tell someone and this varies depending on yourself and when YOU feel comfortable. For me, the first time I was in denial – I probably would have waited a long while before telling him if my Epilepsy did not beat me to it. For my second relationship, I figured I might as well lay it all out on the table. At this point I learned if someone could not accept me for all of me, then I deserved better. I told him in the very beginning – perhaps even at our first date – that I had Epilepsy.

Remember, it is entirely YOUR choice when you tell someone. It is not an easy topic for some to talk about but do keep in mind it also may affect your partner the longer you wait. Just know that no matter what, they will still care for you and love you. They will also be mindful of your feeling about the topic. And if they do not, then take the advice a friend once gave me from a picture she had found:

“Some people will only love you as long as you fit in their box. Don’t be afraid to shove that box up their —”

(well, you get the idea)

Keppra Toxicity

Accidental Overdosing.

pills_02_060925_8_01-2

                If only we lived in a perfect world without mistakes or errors. If only people took the time to listen or reevaluate their decisions. But this is not the world we live in and none of us are without error. What is important is learning from past mistakes and educating yourself about warning signs and how to prevent them if possible.

                When I first got diagnosed with Epilepsy in 2011 at the age of 19 I had already had about 3-4 tonic-clonic seizures within a month. Some I told people about, some I suffered in silence wishing they would go away. There might of even been more but you see, this is when my overdose happened. Part of my life is nothing but bits and pieces. Part of my life I struggle to recall and perhaps also one of the most important parts because this is how it all began. As years went on, more seizures occurred, and side effects from medication began taking their toll, it became even hard to recall the event that occurred that year.  Excuse me if numbers and figures are not exact relating to dosages.


My Story

I had started a new job that I loved, got into a new relationship, connected with old friends, looking into starting college – things were going good; aside from being recently diagnosed with Epilepsy. For me, that was the elephant in the room. I should have been happy with myself and with life, but truthfully I was not. I was started on Keppra after my first seizure or two at a low dose of 500mg twice a day – this is usually the standard starting dose. I listened to the lecture of how I should not drink, reconsider pregnancy, and be careful in my everyday life. I should not drive, I should take breaks when needed, and I should go easy on myself. Most importantly I should NEVER miss a dose. And I never did…perhaps that was the problem.

I obeyed my neurologist word for word. Avoided grapefruit and cough syrup. Took my medication on time, but that did not always stop the seizures. Every two weeks I went back and he increased my dose. Higher and higher it went. I do not remember what my last dose was from that time period but I remember it being a pill and a half in the morning and a pill and a half at night. At this point something did not feel right. My seizures were sort of under control, but something else was going on.

My job became a chore that I dreaded. I could no longer remember how to make drinks or where things were in the café – mind you I have been here for a little while now. My coworkers did not want to work with me because I took “too long” and they felt like I was a responsibility. They started calling me the “seizure girl” and notice I had a little tremor. Eventually my name became nonexistent, I became “seizure girl.” I would forget constantly when I had to go in or what time my shift started. My manger became curious what was going on and I would simply reply “I do not know, but don’t worry, I’m fine.”

Being awake became a task. I was always so tired and wanted to nap. It was hard to learn new things – probably due to the memory lapses and generally feeling “slow” – and I began giving up on going to college. How was I going to manage school when I could not manage my life? Remembering the previous day started to become a task. Have you ever saw 50 First Dates? That was basically my life. My boyfriend would have to leave me notes or else I would not remember he had left for work. He would leave me notes of what we did or talked about the night before. He would leave me notes about my work schedule. Slowly I began not to remember conversations or places I have been and it began to scare me.

What was going on? Was I dying? Did I have a brain tumor? I became frustrated and lashing out at people. I did not want to leave the house or go out in public. Coworkers began to tease me more as it got worse and I would try my best to hold it in. Simply being alive felt like a chore. I was fed up with having to do daily task such as shower or eat. I had no will to function. I had no will to try and socialize. Eventually everyone started to notice. I became a zombie. My memory was nonexistent. I could not recall names at times or words I wanted to say. I barely remembered to take my pills. One day I decided to look up the side effects in detail:

“Max recommended dose: 3000mg/day. Side effects: SUICIDAL THOUGHTS, aggression, agitation, anxiety, apathy, depersonalization, depression, dizziness, hostility, irritability, personality disorder, weakness, drowsiness, dyskinesia, fatigue, coordination difficulties, STEVEN-JOHNSON SYNDROME, TOXIC EPIDERMAL NECROLYSIS” (Davis’s Drug Guide – side note: I capitalized life-threatening side effects)

Alright. So the lack of desire for daily functions and constant sleep made sense, but what about my memory? What about this tremor? What about not being able to find the words I want to use? I am 19 year old, I should not be like this. I was an honor student. I was in advance placement classes. What was wrong with me? I started getting anxious and paranoid at work. I did not want to be there. I no longer cared about work or being in a relationship. I did not care about going back to school. I honestly did not care what happened to me. Then one day I woke up – suddenly I cared. Frantically, I called my neurologist and demanded a blood test – they asked me if I had any recent seizures and they said “your dose is fine then, it is the side effects.” Paranoid still, I moved onto the next in line, my primary care physician and he gladly agreed to do a blood test to check my levels.

For the next few days I anxiously awaited that phone call. Was this me or the medication? Am I just crazy? Is all of this a dream? I was constantly checking, just waiting for the call…then finally it came. The conversation went something like this:

                “Is this __________”

                “Yes..”

                “We have some news for you, you blood draws came back”

                “…yeah..”

                “Cut your dose in half immediately, your Keppra levels are too high. Something is not right and we will notify your neurologist right away. Please do not continue your prescribed dose and make an appointment as soon as possible. If things worsen, come in right away, this is atypical.”

                “..huh….”

                For a minute my world was spinning…what just happened? I was not understanding. What do you mean my levels were too high, my neurologist knows best…so I thought. “It is basically an overdose – it has not made its way to your respiratory functioning yet but if you keep take your prescribed dose it could progress.” All I remember is replying with “oh.” I did not know how to feel. So what do I do? Cut my dose and endure seizures repeatedly? Do I deal with this until I can speak to my specialist and hope I do not end up in the hospital? Now what.

At that point it was too late to cut my dose I already took my pm pill and then next day I still took my usual dose…what did that nurse know? She was not a specialist. So what if something happened, I am sure the hospital could fix it…right? Or maybe this medication was doing everyone a favor. Maybe I should keep this dose. I felt like I was a burden to everyone around me. Maybe this was my fate. Something changed the next day and I immediately called my neurologist, but things were different.. this I do recall:

                “Can I speak to Dr._____”

                “Sure what is your name? Hold on.”  (few minutes had pass) “Hello? Actually…on second thought he does not want to take the call at the moment but you can speak to me. He knows this is about your levels.”

                “..Okay…so what do I do?

                “What do you mean?”

                “What do I do? Should I lower my dose?”

                “I cannot tell you what to do, I am not your prescriber.”

                “Can I talk to my prescriber”

                “He does not want to take your call today.”

                After this game of back and forth and her telling me she cannot help I hung up. So NOW what? I closed my eyes and swallowed my next prescribed dose and called the office again. Same nurse answered I presume. She had the same story. I tried to book an appointment but he was “too busy.” I then purposely left voicemails for appointments and callbacks – nothing. They wiped their hands clean of me. So really, now what? What was I supposed to do? I sat down and thought about it…is this really my fate? Should I listen to my primary care physician? What do I do? I sat down and planned out how to wean myself. Against medical advice, I weaned myself off of Keppra. I also had to look for a new neurologist. And luckily, it did not end worse.


About Keppra Toxicity

Now I can only speak from personal experience and I can tell you what websites say.  Symptoms according to websites include: extreme drowsiness, agitation, aggression, unconsciousness, difficulty breathing, shallow breathing, and coma. I did not have an extreme case nor did it last long enough to get worse. Symptoms from other people include: mobility changes, stuttering, changes in speech, changes in memory, and increasing difficulty with processing information. I was never told how high exactly my blood levels were but it was enough to affect me. I was a small girl at the time, 5’1 and barely 100lbs. Dosages are different for everyone as well as how the medication may affect them. My side effects that told me something was off: severe memory problems and trouble communicating. I cannot definitely say the tremor or issues with learning was completely related to the high Keppra dose. My mood definitely got worse but I cannot say for sure again if that was toxicity or because everything happening at once. I also developed a little bit of a rash as well as the dose increased. It is hard with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) because a lot of what are usually toxicity signs for other medications are what AEDs usually cause. If you EVER feel like something does not feel right or something is off, do NOT hesitate to phone your neurologist or primary care physician. If they do not listen to your request, do not hesitate to ask for a second opinion or go elsewhere. Always advocate for yourself if something does not feel appropriate.


Do you have any experience with Keppra Toxicity? Leave your story below!

You do not own me

Dear Epilepsy,

I hope you are happy; for once more you got in the way of my hopes, dreams, and plans. I planned on graduating in May 2016 with my nursing degree and moving forward with my peers. I planned on trying to get into a pediatrics position while specializing in neurology or oncology. I planned on moving in with my boyfriend and having a proper home for my girls and finally having our family together. But life does not always go as planned.

I now sit at home during what would be my class time. I see posts of people in their scrubs, talking about exams, and anticipating graduation. I sit here alone, while my children are at school, truthfully envious but proud. You all worked so hard to get here and you all deserve the best. But I cannot help but wonder what I did to deserve such a delay. To deserve watching everyone move on without me. Where did I go wrong? Am I not allowed to have dreams?

Epilepsy, you do not own me, but you unfortunately may still have some control. You have stunted my growth in my studies and in my experiences, but you have not stopped me. Epilepsy, I will prevail you and I will succeed. I do not care if you slow my memory down or if I have to read that book three times, I will read it three times more to prove you wrong. I do not care if I have to make extra time to study or ask ridiculous questions – I will ask them proudly and show you I can still do this. My teachers may question my sanity, but in reality they are questioning you. “Will Epilepsy stop her?”

Epilepsy,  you do not own me. I will not let you control my life. I will admit that you have dictated three and a half years and it was not until I saw other patients with Epilepsy suffer the way that I did. They were scared, fearful – their parents were the same. You stopped me from performing, going for jobs, and properly performing tasks. You dictated my relationships, my self-worth, and future plans. You embarrassed me and made me lie. But no longer will you do so. No longer will I hide behind your name. Epilepsy you do not own me.

And for this delay, I will show you no mercy. I will exploit your name and tell everyone about your cruel ways. I will tell them how unforgiving you can be. But you know, you are not all that bad either. You have found me real friends and helped me chose a career path. You helped me find strength within myself. You taught me that asking for help does not make you weak, but makes you strong. You taught me how to be bold and brave and take each day as it comes. You taught me to never take life for granted and live in the moment. Epilepsy you do not own me, but you are part of me. Part of me that I cannot change – but a part of me that makes me who I am.

Thank you Epilepsy.


211

So, what is it like?

What does it feel like?

     For a while, I thought I was the only person who was genuinely curious on what it felt like to have a seizure. My brother could not express himself and it was always a mystery to my parents and myself. Many years later here am I experiencing them for myself! Of course, there are many different types of seizures and even if two people had the same type, they may not experience them the same. Here is a little look into what I experience.


Tonic-Clonic Seizures

      My Epilepsy involves Tonic-clonic seizures. These are the types of seizures most people visualize when you first tell them you have a seizure disorder. To be proper; the tonic phase comes first which is when all the muscles stiffen and air can be pressed past the vocal chords making a moaning sound or a cry. In this phase we lose consciousness and immediately drop to the floor and bite our tongue, cheek, drool, and faces sometimes can become blue. But before this occurs, some people may experience an aura – some type of indication a seizure is coming. This could be a sound, smell, taste, feeling “strange,” headache, dizziness, and so on. Then comes the clonic phase; arms and legs begin to jerk rapidly in a rhythmic motion and here is where some of us may lose control of our bladder (or bowels) as our bodies begin to relax and consciousness returns.  On average, these seizures can last 1-3 minutes; anything over 5 minutes is considered an emergency and the person should be brought to the hospital. This is then all followed by a postictal phase which can last from 5-30 minutes on average (sometimes longer). We are tired, we are confused, and we are disoriented.

     Now here is my personal experience and how a typical seizure occurs for me. I will be completely fine all day, going about my daily routine. Suddenly, my mind stops and everything is black. If I am talking I stop mid sentence and let out a moan, if I am quiet I stare blankly. People will begin to call my name and I will not respond, nor will I remember. I then let out a scream (more like a shrill from what I have been told) and instantly fall to the ground and begin to convulse. Typically my seizures last 3-5 minutes which always ends in an ER trip. I never have lost control of my bladder or bowels, but I have bitten my tongue pretty bad and usually have blood on my face. I will slowly begin to regain consciousness and will try to make sense of what happened. I will not remember your name, but I will remember your face. Then everything gets black again. I am not seizing, I have just passed out. Sometimes I think everything is black but I am talking and responding as if I am fine. I am not fine. Do not leave me alone. I will not remember this. This happened once and I did in fact end up seizing again, which was atypical, and resulted in a medicated coma. Eventually, I truly do regain consciousness and slowly become reoriented..but I have no idea what happened before that moment, the day is wiped from my memory, and the entire week is fuzzy. My memory will still be effected over the next few days and I go into an emotional funk. Anxiety now controls my mind as I try to continue on as if nothing happened. This is my  life with Epilepsy.

     generalizedtcillustration

(Photo and educational credit: www.epilepsy.com)


If you have tonic-clonic seizures, leave a comment below and share your experience!

Keppra – levetiracetam

“Well for your age group – its the safest”

       And they are right. At the reproductive age of 24, it has been deemed safe (will link credible article below and there are more articles on that site) than most medications used to treat epilepsy. I even volunteered to be in a trial to study the side effects of Keppra on pregnancy. But man does it make you agitate/angry/aggressive/overall everywhere on the emotional spectrum. 
     Keppra – levetiracetam: onset rapid. Duration 12 hours. Peak 1-1.5 hours. Common side effects: aggression, agitation, anger, anxiety, apathy, denationalization, depression, dizziness, hostility, irritability, personality disorder, and weakness. Life-threatening side effects: Suicidal thoughts, Steven-johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Used for: partial onset seizures, primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, status epilepticus, and neonatal seizures. Can be given by mouth in tablet or oral solution form or via IV. This has been engraved into my mind due to school and being on the medication. I know enough to know the drug can cause these side effects for others but when it comes to myself, I hate admitting the medication has changed me. I wish I was immune to these side effects but it is a sacrifice I take for wanting a “safe” drug. As stated in a previous blog, B6 – also known as pyridoxine, is supposed to help even out the side effects. I am really hoping so because the last two days have been rough.
     I got upset with a worker at a local grocery store because she said I could not go through the express line although I did qualify for the express lane. I got upset with a fast food worker because they forgot my drink and swore at me under their breath. Usually I am very nice and would never say anything to them out of respect but man did I sail right into them. There was no holding back and in the moment I just did not care. Once I left, I felt a little bad and embarrassed I acted that way. I feel bad blaming the medication but honestly since they upped it I just have zero tolerance for people. It is not like I can say “sorry, the meds made me do it” although it may be true. Cannot wait to get through this phase…if it is a phase. 
    My memory is still having some issues. Not too sure if its still from the accident or the medication..time will tell
14279032_1575353169437116_948070795_n
(Photo credit: Self – thanks to apps)

As promised, here is a link to one website (out of many) where you can find credible research articles on current medications – such as Keppra – and other things going on in medicine/medical field: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3854744/ 

Let me know your experiences!

 

The Normal One

Yes, the “Normal” One..that was my one job – to be normal.


       For a little background history, I come from a medical mystery family. An unknown genetic mishap has caused varying degrees of physical and mental disabilities for the males in my family; my two younger brothers included. I watched and went with my parents to various doctor appointments, testing, genetic counseling sessions, and so on. I was introduced to this wonderful world of medicine quite early and learned quite a bit on my travels. I was the “normal” one. I was not cognitively delayed and was placed in honors and advanced placement classes. I was passionate about music and played multiple instruments for school and the community. I even danced too. But then it happened. 
    2011 I endured the storm. I had my first episode, moment, whichever way people would like to term it. I had my first seizure. I have heard people talk about how they can sense them coming, they have a feeling, smell a weird scent, or they taste something in their mouth. For me, they come without warning. I am fine and within the next moment..my world is black. My memory is erased. I do not know where I am and I will not know who you are. Slowly reality will settle back in and embarrassment, fear, and sadness take over. This is my storm. This is my reality.
   I will never forget the look on my father’s face or the fear in my friends’ eyes who witnessed it. His perfect daughter and their normal friend was not so normal anymore. We hoped it was a fluke, a sickness, something..but it was not. It became a way of life. It became Epilepsy. 

543371_4120308526176_1790435540_n
(Photo Credit: Self – honestly; bought and planted this flower)