Embarrassment and Humility: Taking Control

Epilepsy comes in many different forms and strike us in many ways. Some people have auras, which allows them to feel when a seizure is coming on. Some people, like myself, have no idea when a seizure is coming until you wake up in a hospital bed not knowing what day it is or who is around you. But something we can all to relate to on at least one occasion is having a seizure in public. No matter what type of seizure, it can be humiliating, embarrassing, or overwhelming for that person. We all have our own ways with dealing with these type of situations, but here are some tips, tricks, and methods to get you through the post seizure madness.

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Looking at our emotions

Some people may report feelings of embarrassment, humiliation, or feelings of being overwhelmed after a seizure. To help better ourselves and ease these feelings, we must understand where these feelings may arise. Embarrassment itself is a very self-conscious emotion. No one else will experience this emotion but you and not everyone will experience it in the same manner. Embarrassment usually arises from someone feeling as though they failed to act appropriately socially, a sense of guilt or shame, and a feeling as though their guard was let down and their pride was hurt. It tends to be triggered in social situations, like having a seizure in public.  It is also a very socially connected emotion.

In my opinion, having a seizure is a very vulnerable state. You lose control of your body, your thoughts, and your surroundings. You no longer can protect or shield yourself; you can no longer care for yourself and well-being. Your body is just there, on display, for some undetermined amount of time, without you having any control. This can be very overwhelming and trigger a range of emotions. But luckily, there are different ways to deal our feelings.

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Remember: Take Control

How do you take a control when you completely lost control of yourself in front of a crowd of people? People are social and emotional creatures, they will mimic what you project after a traumatic event more often than not. One way to take control is by changing the mood of the situation. One way to do this is by displaying confidence. People will ease their tension and divert attention when they see that you are aware of what is going on and show a level of competency. Everyone will have their own way of taking control of their situation and easing the fears of those around them; another example would be through laughter. While yes, why should you have to worry about how those around you feel; you will find that being able to break the tension and having a sense of control in the smallest ways will help ease your feelings of embarrassment. Even if you only start with taking control of your own thoughts after a seizure, in due time, you will be able to apply it to the masses.

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Laughter

Laughter is the best medicine While yes, there is nothing funny about having Epilepsy or a seizure, laughter can be used as a coping mechanism. If a seizure was to occur around friends or with someone whom you are close and comfortable with, try making light of the situation. I have heard some people say “yeah sorry, my brain malfunctioned” or “what do you mean, you do not pee yourself too?” While this can be very hard for some people to poke some fun at, especially early on in a diagnosis, some people find this a way to deescalate the tension and worry within those around them.

When people see you crack a smile or treat a situation in a relaxed manner, they also tend to relax – seeing it as not an emergent situation. They tend to stop trying to overcompensate for your feelings by being overly concerned and overbearing. Some people want their space after a seizure – a good way to make someone feel safe and give you that space is to make the situation light. This does not have to be directly through laughter of course, one could just simply explain, “oh this happens a lot, nothing new” then point out a positive in the situation. That person or the surrounding people will see that you are handling the situation in a positive way, therefore make it easier for them to feel positive about you.

 How to apply to self: You can apply these methods on a personal level to. Take a moment to lighten the situation from within whether it is through laughter, pointing out positives, or simply telling yourself “here we go again, I got this.” Be positive, be uplifting – you are doing amazing.

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Education

Education? Who is in the mood to give a lecture on Epilepsy and seizures after having one? Probably no one, but there are some beneficial factors for giving a brief synapse of your condition or type of seizures to those around you. Quite similar to what I mentioned in laughter, it helps people ease up and feel confident in your ability to care for yourself. It eases the tension and in return will help you feel less embarrassed or overwhelmed due to being moved out of the spotlight.

Have you ever noticed that nurses tend to give a sigh of relief when they know you have a history of seizures? They are able to make the mood lighter for you and give you the proper time that you need. Aside from the fact that it is probably less work on their behalf, they have confidence that you know what to do to care for yourself. This diverts attention away from you and allows you to reconnect with yourself. This is even more true for the everyday average Joe. If you can show off your knowledge, their attention will go elsewhere and ease the feelings of embarrassment.

 How to apply to self: Remind yourself, you know yourself and your condition best. You know what to do; you know how to manage your seizures. Boost your confidence through what you know. You are a smart cookie, and a tough one at that!

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Getting Answers

Sometimes we get embarrassed when we do not know how things were perceived. The unknown can be quite scary and in the realm of Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders, that unknown realm can be our best unfortunate friend. Finding answers gives us a sense of security and helps us feel calm. Sometimes after a seizure, you need to do just that. Ask what happened, ask who was around, do not be afraid to approach people. You may not see it in the moment, but they want to help – most just do not know how. They are willing to answer and be there for you. They are not passing judgement; although it may feel that way because we did something atypical, yet typical for us. Gain control by getting answers and making the unknown known. You will have a better sense of realizing how people actually feel and that the situation was not as bad as you think.

 How to apply to self: If you are uncomfortable with approaching people, ground yourself. Look at yourself, feel what hurts, see how much time has passed, think of the lease severe seizure you had. Try to answer your own questions by observation and feelings, give yourself that validation that it really was not as bad as you thought. Let yourself breathe.

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Moving Forward

This may be easier said then done for some. How do you just “move on” from having a seizure and becoming what you perceive as a public spectacle?  First, take a moment and breathe. Ground yourself to the present, remind yourself that you are okay. Collect your thoughts and feelings and when you are ready, move one. Literally and figuratively. Just get right back up and keep moving forward. Thank those around you for their help and support, reassure them that you are okay, and walk away like it never happened.

Now, this may require quite a bit of practice and the “fake it till you make it” theory, but there is no reason to linger on something that is not making you feel good. Let your mind move forward, do not dwell on what happened or could have happened, do not put all your focus on the seizure itself – at this moment focus on yourself and your well-being. You are safe, you are secure. This will also no longer make the seizure the focal point. When people see you moving on, they know it is safe for them to move on too. When people see your bravery, even if you must fake it at first, they will be brave for you. You have a lot more control than you think.

 How to apply to self: While even doing this on a personal level only may be difficult, just give it a shot. Let your mind go. Do not get wrapped up on focusing on the seizure and the event, focus on the now and go from there. Prioritize your safety and find comfort in knowing you are still here, you still have a pulse, you still have life left in you. You can get through this, you will get through this. Redirect your attention and focus elsewhere

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Forgive Yourself

You may not feel like you are mad at yourself or that you are blaming yourself, but on a deeper level, that just may be the root cause Even if it is not the situation for you specifically, still take the time to remind yourself, this is part of you – this is NOT you. Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders do not control you or your life. It may try for 5 minutes or maybe even 10-20 minutes, but remember, you are a fierce warrior and you will take your life and time right back and hold onto it longer than it ever could. We cannot control every aspect of our life, with or without seizures – unexpected things will happen, but if we can make peace with ourselves, we are one step ahead.

You are a Warrior.

Keep strong.

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Looking for how to handle with Seizures in Public?

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http://thestorminsidemyhead.com/2016/10/seizures-in-public/

 

Fireworks and Flickering Lights

Fireworks

This blog was originally written for Guy Fawkes Night/Bonfire Night which was celebrated November 5th in the U.K. (see the post here) The more I thought about it and searched around, the more I saw that it can be difficult to gather information on how to prepare for holidays that involve firework displays and flickering lights. Here is what you need to know before going out and celebrating.


Get packing!

                Before heading out to your festivities, make sure you have a few things handy such as:

  • A watch/charged phone with a clock
  • Your medication(s)/extra medication
  • Something to drink/snacks
  • Emergency medication
  • Insurance card and picture ID
  • Medical alert ID – if you do not have one, take an index card and write in big letter “Medical Alert” and on the back place your name, date of birth, medication(s), diagnosis, and emergency contact

It will also be beneficial to have a plan of action developed between you and whomever it is you are attending festivities with. This way, everyone will be on the same page and prepared if a situation occurred. You will also want to discuss how emergency medication should be administered and when to call an ambulance. What else may be beneficial, of course depending on the type of seizures associated with your Epilepsy, is preparing a med-pack/first aid kit. This can include items such as gloves, bandages, notebook and pen, hair tie, and anything else you may need specific to your seizure (find out about my med-pack here: http://thestorminsidemyhead.com/2016/09/epilepsy-med-pack/)


Let the Show Begin!

While firework displays can be absolutely captivating – it may send those with Epilepsy, especially Photosensitive Epilepsy, into a bit of a tizzy. Here are some quick tips to help reduce the chances of triggering a seizure:

  • Take your medication on time – things can get hectic when meeting up with friend and celebrating but be sure to set an alarm just in case so you remember to take your medication. This is your first defense against a seizure.
  • Get sleep before the event – you will want to make sure you get plenty of sleep, especially if you have a long night ahead. Lack of sleep get lower your seizure threshold and the more rest you can get the better.
  • Eat, drink, and be merry – Be sure to stay hydrated and get a proper meal in. This will help increase your seizure threshold and decrease the chance of a seizure occurrence.

←Now for the Finale→

  • Cover one eye – do you start to feel funny the colorful lights glisten? How about during the finale? This can be tough for those with Epilepsy but surprisingly, cover one eye can be beneficial in preventing a seizure. This reduced the amount of visual stimulus coming into the brain; therefore, the brain does not have to work as hard to stay calm.
  • Do not sit up close – that may sound like bummer but the further away you are, the less likely it will trigger a seizure due to the light being less intense as well as the flickering being reduced by the fireworks.
  • Polarized sunglasses – wearing sunglasses at night may sound silly but, this can actually help reduce your odds of a seizure – especially for those with Photosensitive Epilepsy. Now, they are probably going to be more of use during the day, but if you know the flickering of the fireworks or large bonfires will probably leave you feeling uneasy, go pick up a pair. If you are wondering what type of lenses, some research articles suggest blue lenses but again, this depends on the person.
  • Let someone else drive – it has been a long night, you watched a beautiful light show, and now it is time to call it night; well for some. On your way home, if you are able to drive – ask someone else to. This will not keep yourself safe, but others around you too. Seizures can strike at any time and is better to stay on the safe side. Do not be afraid to ask a friend.

Do not forget, at any point that you begin to feel an aura or a twitch – tell someone. Let someone know that you do not feel okay and get yourself to a safe area. If you know it will result in a tonic-clonic/convulsing type of seizure, get low to the ground and away from the waterfront if you are near one. Make sure you are not near any hard objects and that someone is with you and ready. If you are unsure what the resulting seizure may be, take the precaution and get low.


Are You Ready?

                While it may seem like a lot of work, your health and safety are worth it. No one wants to spend a holiday in the hospital while everyone else is out and about. Take care of yourself and follow these tips to ensure a safe time and wonderful time/


Do you have any tips and tricks you would like to share? Remember these tips can be used for multiple holidays that may involve:

  • Flickering lights/flashing lights
  • Fireworks
  • Late nights

Seizures In Public

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“Where am I? How did I get here?” – does this sound familiar? What do you after you had a seizure in public. “Did anyone notice? What do I do now?” Here are some quick tips on dealing with Epilepsy and Seizures in public


Before a Seizure

  • Medical Alert ID: If your seizures come without warning, are frequent in nature, or you become disorientated and confused for a while after a seizure – it would be beneficial to invest in a medical alert band. This way if anything does happen in a public place, you will have some basic information in visible sight. Information usually includes: you name, your condition, medication(s), and an emergency contact. If you have rescue medication – may place that as well.
  • Spare Medication: If you are unsure whether you will be back in time for your next dose or a chance you may stay elsewhere for the night – bring extra medication. This is your first line of defense against a seizure and you should always be prepared. Sometimes we do not know who we will run into or where exactly we are going so having at least one extra dose on us can be beneficial.
  • Rescue Medication: Carry your rescue medication (if prescribed), wherever you go. You never know what may happen or what may send you off. Be sure to have specific directions along with it or on an index card in a med-pack or a bag that you use so others may administer it to you in an event of an emergency.
  • Eat, drink, and sleep: Sometimes we get busy and tend forget about our basic needs. Sometimes we may think “well, I can wait until the next meal.” Before going out, be sure you have ate something, are staying hydrated, and have plenty of rest – especially if you have a long night ahead of you. Of course, if you are going out to dinner or lunch, you do not want to have a full course meal but be sure you have had a little snack at some point beforehand. This will help increase your seizure threshold, meaning it will make it harder for seizure activity to occur, and help keep you going strong. You need to give your body and brain the best possible chance.
  • Bring a med-pack/First aid kit: It does not have to be anything major and tailor it to your specific type of seizures. See here for what is in my med-pack if you need help getting started – reminder: this is tailored towards me and I made it more on the universal side. I have tonic-clonic seizures without auras, therefor I prepare for injury. I do not wet myself or lose control of my bowels, therefor I did not state packing extra clothes. It depends on your specific situation.
  • Auras: If you have auras; do not ignore. If something does not feel right, take the warning. Whether this means going back home or finding a less stimulating area – do so. Do so in a place where you can get low to the ground and away from objects if possible to promote personal safety. If your seizures do not involve convulsing – still do find a less stimulating place to relax and try to keep as calm as possible.
  • Go out in pairs: If you have frequent seizures; there is no harm in making sure you have someone to go out with you. While yes, this can be annoying you, it is a matter of your health and safety. If you just feel “off,” when you usually do not or know that you have not gotten a lot of sleep and that is a trigger – do not be afraid to phone a friend or family member to tag along with you.
  • Call/Text: If you are going out alone, let someone know where you are going. If you feel off, call or text someone so there is a time frame of reference and someone will be aware of where you are in case of an emergency.

After a Seizure

  • Disoriented and Confused: If you have no idea where you are or who is around you; do not panic. Take in some deep breaths, try to relax, and ask someone what happened. If there is no one around – take time to relax and slowly reorient yourself. Try to remember the last thing you were doing or place you have been. Check recent texts, calls, and even receipts to see what you can remember last.
  • Phone a friend: If a seizure had just occurred, it may be beneficial to call a friend to accompany you, pick you up, or simply talk you through your postictal phase. This friend may be able to help reorient you and will be able to help you track your seizure.
  • Check for injuries: If you are alone, check yourself for injuries. If someone is with you, if you feel comfortable have them also check. You want to make sure no harm was done and assess if medical attention is advised.
  • How long was I out for? If you do not know or do not have a frame of reference – call your neurologist if it is during regular office hours. If it is late at night, assess yourself or have someone else assess you. There is no harm in taking a visit to the ER or walk-in if you are unsure but not all seizures may require medical attention immediately. Regardless, phone your physician or specialist as soon as you can so they are aware or if you have a plan to document occurrence, just do as your care plan states.
  • Do not drive: Right after a seizure had occurred, I strongly suggest to not drive yourself home. Ask a family member or friend to come meet you to either pick you up. You may have enough assistance where someone else could drive your car home; if not, talk to the security of the facility you are located at or manager on what to do with your vehicle. I am sure they will be understanding and if anything, call your local police department. They would rather you be safe than attempting to drive home
  • Rest: Take your time, take things slow – do things at your own pace. When you get the chance, be sure to rest. It can be stressful having a seizure out in public, especially by yourself. For myself, when I have a seizure alone, it leaves me uneasy with a lot of unanswered questions and this may happen if no one is with you during the time you come to. Just remind yourself: you are safe, you are alive, and you are doing okay.

Gaining independence from Epilepsy can be hard, but is doable with the right support system. Never give up hope

What if you are the friend/family present during the seizure? What if you were a stranger walking by? Do you know what to do? Check  here