Fireworks and Flickering Lights

Fireworks

This blog was originally written for Guy Fawkes Night/Bonfire Night which was celebrated November 5th in the U.K. (see the post here) The more I thought about it and searched around, the more I saw that it can be difficult to gather information on how to prepare for holidays that involve firework displays and flickering lights. Here is what you need to know before going out and celebrating.


Get packing!

                Before heading out to your festivities, make sure you have a few things handy such as:

  • A watch/charged phone with a clock
  • Your medication(s)/extra medication
  • Something to drink/snacks
  • Emergency medication
  • Insurance card and picture ID
  • Medical alert ID – if you do not have one, take an index card and write in big letter “Medical Alert” and on the back place your name, date of birth, medication(s), diagnosis, and emergency contact

It will also be beneficial to have a plan of action developed between you and whomever it is you are attending festivities with. This way, everyone will be on the same page and prepared if a situation occurred. You will also want to discuss how emergency medication should be administered and when to call an ambulance. What else may be beneficial, of course depending on the type of seizures associated with your Epilepsy, is preparing a med-pack/first aid kit. This can include items such as gloves, bandages, notebook and pen, hair tie, and anything else you may need specific to your seizure (find out about my med-pack here: http://thestorminsidemyhead.com/2016/09/epilepsy-med-pack/)


Let the Show Begin!

While firework displays can be absolutely captivating – it may send those with Epilepsy, especially Photosensitive Epilepsy, into a bit of a tizzy. Here are some quick tips to help reduce the chances of triggering a seizure:

  • Take your medication on time – things can get hectic when meeting up with friend and celebrating but be sure to set an alarm just in case so you remember to take your medication. This is your first defense against a seizure.
  • Get sleep before the event – you will want to make sure you get plenty of sleep, especially if you have a long night ahead. Lack of sleep get lower your seizure threshold and the more rest you can get the better.
  • Eat, drink, and be merry – Be sure to stay hydrated and get a proper meal in. This will help increase your seizure threshold and decrease the chance of a seizure occurrence.

←Now for the Finale→

  • Cover one eye – do you start to feel funny the colorful lights glisten? How about during the finale? This can be tough for those with Epilepsy but surprisingly, cover one eye can be beneficial in preventing a seizure. This reduced the amount of visual stimulus coming into the brain; therefore, the brain does not have to work as hard to stay calm.
  • Do not sit up close – that may sound like bummer but the further away you are, the less likely it will trigger a seizure due to the light being less intense as well as the flickering being reduced by the fireworks.
  • Polarized sunglasses – wearing sunglasses at night may sound silly but, this can actually help reduce your odds of a seizure – especially for those with Photosensitive Epilepsy. Now, they are probably going to be more of use during the day, but if you know the flickering of the fireworks or large bonfires will probably leave you feeling uneasy, go pick up a pair. If you are wondering what type of lenses, some research articles suggest blue lenses but again, this depends on the person.
  • Let someone else drive – it has been a long night, you watched a beautiful light show, and now it is time to call it night; well for some. On your way home, if you are able to drive – ask someone else to. This will not keep yourself safe, but others around you too. Seizures can strike at any time and is better to stay on the safe side. Do not be afraid to ask a friend.

Do not forget, at any point that you begin to feel an aura or a twitch – tell someone. Let someone know that you do not feel okay and get yourself to a safe area. If you know it will result in a tonic-clonic/convulsing type of seizure, get low to the ground and away from the waterfront if you are near one. Make sure you are not near any hard objects and that someone is with you and ready. If you are unsure what the resulting seizure may be, take the precaution and get low.


Are You Ready?

                While it may seem like a lot of work, your health and safety are worth it. No one wants to spend a holiday in the hospital while everyone else is out and about. Take care of yourself and follow these tips to ensure a safe time and wonderful time/


Do you have any tips and tricks you would like to share? Remember these tips can be used for multiple holidays that may involve:

  • Flickering lights/flashing lights
  • Fireworks
  • Late nights

Seizures In Public

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“Where am I? How did I get here?” – does this sound familiar? What do you after you had a seizure in public. “Did anyone notice? What do I do now?” Here are some quick tips on dealing with Epilepsy and Seizures in public


Before a Seizure

  • Medical Alert ID: If your seizures come without warning, are frequent in nature, or you become disorientated and confused for a while after a seizure – it would be beneficial to invest in a medical alert band. This way if anything does happen in a public place, you will have some basic information in visible sight. Information usually includes: you name, your condition, medication(s), and an emergency contact. If you have rescue medication – may place that as well.
  • Spare Medication: If you are unsure whether you will be back in time for your next dose or a chance you may stay elsewhere for the night – bring extra medication. This is your first line of defense against a seizure and you should always be prepared. Sometimes we do not know who we will run into or where exactly we are going so having at least one extra dose on us can be beneficial.
  • Rescue Medication: Carry your rescue medication (if prescribed), wherever you go. You never know what may happen or what may send you off. Be sure to have specific directions along with it or on an index card in a med-pack or a bag that you use so others may administer it to you in an event of an emergency.
  • Eat, drink, and sleep: Sometimes we get busy and tend forget about our basic needs. Sometimes we may think “well, I can wait until the next meal.” Before going out, be sure you have ate something, are staying hydrated, and have plenty of rest – especially if you have a long night ahead of you. Of course, if you are going out to dinner or lunch, you do not want to have a full course meal but be sure you have had a little snack at some point beforehand. This will help increase your seizure threshold, meaning it will make it harder for seizure activity to occur, and help keep you going strong. You need to give your body and brain the best possible chance.
  • Bring a med-pack/First aid kit: It does not have to be anything major and tailor it to your specific type of seizures. See here for what is in my med-pack if you need help getting started – reminder: this is tailored towards me and I made it more on the universal side. I have tonic-clonic seizures without auras, therefor I prepare for injury. I do not wet myself or lose control of my bowels, therefor I did not state packing extra clothes. It depends on your specific situation.
  • Auras: If you have auras; do not ignore. If something does not feel right, take the warning. Whether this means going back home or finding a less stimulating area – do so. Do so in a place where you can get low to the ground and away from objects if possible to promote personal safety. If your seizures do not involve convulsing – still do find a less stimulating place to relax and try to keep as calm as possible.
  • Go out in pairs: If you have frequent seizures; there is no harm in making sure you have someone to go out with you. While yes, this can be annoying you, it is a matter of your health and safety. If you just feel “off,” when you usually do not or know that you have not gotten a lot of sleep and that is a trigger – do not be afraid to phone a friend or family member to tag along with you.
  • Call/Text: If you are going out alone, let someone know where you are going. If you feel off, call or text someone so there is a time frame of reference and someone will be aware of where you are in case of an emergency.

After a Seizure

  • Disoriented and Confused: If you have no idea where you are or who is around you; do not panic. Take in some deep breaths, try to relax, and ask someone what happened. If there is no one around – take time to relax and slowly reorient yourself. Try to remember the last thing you were doing or place you have been. Check recent texts, calls, and even receipts to see what you can remember last.
  • Phone a friend: If a seizure had just occurred, it may be beneficial to call a friend to accompany you, pick you up, or simply talk you through your postictal phase. This friend may be able to help reorient you and will be able to help you track your seizure.
  • Check for injuries: If you are alone, check yourself for injuries. If someone is with you, if you feel comfortable have them also check. You want to make sure no harm was done and assess if medical attention is advised.
  • How long was I out for? If you do not know or do not have a frame of reference – call your neurologist if it is during regular office hours. If it is late at night, assess yourself or have someone else assess you. There is no harm in taking a visit to the ER or walk-in if you are unsure but not all seizures may require medical attention immediately. Regardless, phone your physician or specialist as soon as you can so they are aware or if you have a plan to document occurrence, just do as your care plan states.
  • Do not drive: Right after a seizure had occurred, I strongly suggest to not drive yourself home. Ask a family member or friend to come meet you to either pick you up. You may have enough assistance where someone else could drive your car home; if not, talk to the security of the facility you are located at or manager on what to do with your vehicle. I am sure they will be understanding and if anything, call your local police department. They would rather you be safe than attempting to drive home
  • Rest: Take your time, take things slow – do things at your own pace. When you get the chance, be sure to rest. It can be stressful having a seizure out in public, especially by yourself. For myself, when I have a seizure alone, it leaves me uneasy with a lot of unanswered questions and this may happen if no one is with you during the time you come to. Just remind yourself: you are safe, you are alive, and you are doing okay.

Gaining independence from Epilepsy can be hard, but is doable with the right support system. Never give up hope

What if you are the friend/family present during the seizure? What if you were a stranger walking by? Do you know what to do? Check  here

Epilepsy Med-Pack

       Always be prepared

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I was greatly inspired by my good friend Tori on making an Epilepsy Toolkit. After my recent accident and knowing that if it was not for a firefighter being involved; there is no promise I would have been as well off as I was. Then I started thinking some more – what if I am able to drive again and get into an accident while having a seizure? What if I saw someone else having a seizure (this has happened before)? I decided to take the next step.

This is my Med-pack; essentially a first aid kit tailored to your liking. I found these nifty little bags at a local Rite Aid and they had coupons inside for things that one might buy. Here is the run down on my version of the Epilepsy Toolkit.


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  • Note book and pen – that might be silly as someone having a seizure may or may not be able to communicate. But timing a seizure is very important! When an emergency situation occurs, it may be hard to remember dates and times while tending to someone so take a second and write it down! This is very beneficial for the person you are helping, their medical provider, and for you! Remember: After 5 minutes call an ambulance – or if there is no medical alert ID can be found.
  • Alcohol wipes and gloves (latex free preferably) – For me personally, I have tonic-clonic seizures that come without warning. So yes, I will fall and usually there is blood. If someone else was bleeding I would also wanted gloves and something to clean their wound with. If you are making your own first-aid kit or med-pack be sure to use latex free gloves. You never know who will be helping YOU in an emergency and you do not want two emergencies going on at once
  • Bandages of all sizes – Some people with epilepsy will hurt themselves and bandages can become quite useful!
  • Butterfly closures – okay, so some of you might be like “what in the world is that” (see picture below). It helps hold skin in pace for small wounds that might need more than a bandage. If you think someone might need stitches, slap a butterfly closure on them until help arrives

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  • Gauze pads of various sizes – This is mostly because of my car accident and seeing the mass amounts of blood everywhere. If someone is bleeding a lot, these will be more beneficial to you. If you needed to set yourself up a little field to lay things out, hey gauze pads work for that too. Also, if someone is puking and you want to give them a little bib, gauze pads can help
  • Paper tape – I say paper tape over cloth tape because it is easier on the skin and less chance of a reaction to occur. If you need to tape gauzes to someone or something is not sticking well, use the paper tape
  • Tissues – Some of us may foam at the mouth, drool, or vomit so it is helpful to have these laying around.
  • Scissors – not every day kitchen shears but something you would see in the medical field. If someone is seizing and the clothing around them is too tight – use scissors!
  • Antibiotic Ointment – for those wound that bandages would fix up. The more you can help clean out wounds the better to decrease the risk of infection.
  • Hair tie – if someone seriously injured their face or part of their head you would want to get hair out of there or if the person is vomiting.
  • Survival Wrap – okay, this coming in handy probably sounds very slim as a wrap but it is meant to help prevent heat loss. Well, if you are waiting for an ambulance in the winter this actually could be very helpful. But it is also super reflective and could be used to warn oncoming traffic or grab attention. This can also be used as shade and prevent over exposure to the sun. I just had this in my house and hey, you never know

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     I got lucky and my medical ID came with its own little pouch. It has the medical alert symbol on it and in there I placed an index card with my full name, date of birth, emergency contact(s), diagnosis, type(s) of seizures, list of medications, name of my neurologist, types of insurance I have, when to call an ambulance, where my med-pack is located and a brief run through of epilepsy first aid. I always have my insurance cards on me as well as a picture ID so I do not worry about placing them in there. I also listed my children’s names on the card in case they were ever with me. I carry this pouch everywhere with me and I will bring the med-pack if I am traveling.

This might seem a little over the top (did I mention I am a nurse in training?) but after my experiences with Epilepsy I would rather be over than under prepared. Also, this can be used for just about any situation and it is always just a good idea to have something similar with you in your car or on your travels. I hope this was able to help some of you out and maybe have some of you start your own med-pack.


Did I forget anything?

Feel free to leave a comment below on what you think should be included. Also, check out Victoria’s Epilepsy Toolkit here and see what she has: https://chroniclesofkeppra.wordpress.com/2016/09/11/the-epilepsy-toolkit/

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Seizure First Aid: How to Respond

What do I do?

       Watching someone have a seizure can be terrifying. They can happen to anyone, at any age, any time, at any place. Would you know what to do?

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  • Airway & Breathing: If you see someone having a seizure, check their airway and breathing. Make note if they are struggling to breathe, if there is blood or drool/foam coming from the mouth, and if they are vomitting. You want to make sure they have a clear airway through this process. While you may not be a medical professional, an easy way and a huge help is to place the person on their side. This allows fluid to drain out of the mouth and keep their airway clear. Some people vomit during their seizure so it is extra important that if you have any uncertainty on what to do, place them on their side.
  • Remain with them for the entire duration: Unless you have someone else there or can get someone else there, do NOT leave them during the seizure. Some types will cause people to completely lose control of their body and consciousness. It is also important that if you saw the seizure begin that you remain or pass on information to the next person so they can get an accurate depiction of what happened.
  • Time the seizure: As soon as you notice someone is having a seizure, make note of the time and when it is over, note what time is ended. This can be very beneficial to the person and medical professionals. If a seizure lasts over 5 minutes – call an ambulance; they need medical assistance and could result in a medical emergency.
  • Prevent Injury: You want to try your best by helping the person avoid additional harm. Move hard objects out of their way, if they are not on the ground already (and depending on the type if it makes them a fall risk) – lay them down on their side or sit them down, loosen tight clothing around the neck, and cushion their head if possible. Do NOT place anything into their mouth as this will cause harm. Do NOT  restrain or hold the person down as this could also cause harm to the person or yourself.
  • Remain Calm: Easier said then done but it is important for you as a caregiver to remain calm. Take a few deep breathes for yourself and focus on getting through each second and each minute until the person comes to. You do not have to call 911 unless the seizure is over 5 minutes, the person is injured in the process, person has back-to-back seizures, not waking up or regaining consciousness after the seizure, or there is another underlying issue that requires emergency personnel.
  • Be Supportive: After a seizure a person may become embarrassed, scared, worried, anxious, distraught, confused, disoriented, tired, or emotional. It is important to listen and remain with the person until they are fully aware and feel safe. If you cannot stay with them, be sure to call someone to be with them during this time. For some types of seizures, you will have to explain everything that happened to the person since they will not remember. Remember: be patient.

Helpful Tips

  • Look for a medical alert band. Not every person will have one but this is an important device with the person’s name, condition, and medication. Some bands will also have contact information – if able, be sure to contact these people to make them aware. If someone is having a seizure and does not have an alert band – if you feel uncertain, call 911 as this may be their first seizure.
  • If this is someone’s first seizure – take them to the emergency room. There might be an underlying condition associated with it and it will give a baseline to their neurologist and physician.
  • Do NOT give the person food, water or pills (basically anything by mouth) until they are fully awake and alert and orientated. This becomes a choking hazard and sometimes can even send food and water into the lungs and cause other issues. How do you know if someone is alert and oriented?
  1. What is your name?
  2. Where are you right now?
  3. What year is it? What month is it? What day is it?
  4. Who is the current president?

     Hopefully you found this helpful and pass it on to your friends, family, and peers!

Remember; education is key.