Coping with Epilepsy – Social Acceptance

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The Social Side Effects

Epilepsy affects many parts of our lives; friendships, family, work, school, relationships, and so on. There can be negative social ramifications such as losing what was once best friends, family distancing themselves, or coworkers and colleagues becoming hesitant when around you. Some of us deal with stigma in our daily life followed by shocked faces and funny looks. But there are also positive outcomes like finding new friends, building stronger relationships, and finding new opportunities that you never knew existed. I have recently written a post on self-acceptance of epilepsy and the journey it takes to get there – which can be quite long. But how do you deal when others are having an issue of acceptance? How do you cope with the loss of friends and the distance of family members? You will be surprised with how similar both roads are. Here are some tips I have learned along my journey.


Self-Acceptance

First and foremost, you must accept Epilepsy to a degree within yourself before you try to talk to friends and family about it. Of course it is possible to go ahead or simultaneously travel the route of personal acceptance and social acceptance but things will become easier if they are already accepted within. I often find topics to be easier when I understand them for myself. Even if you do not completely accept the idea of Epilepsy entering your life – at least begin the process of understanding Epilepsy or perhaps your process will start here.

Educate

As I said in my last post – education is key. Educate your family, friends, coworkers, and colleagues on Epilepsy and your type of seizures. This will help them gain confidence in your knowledge about you condition as well as giving them personal confidence on how to help you. People are terrified of the unknown – they do not like to be caught off guard and some do not like the feeling of responsibility that they did not ask for

  • Erase the Stigma: Education is also helpful in removing stigma. “You have Epilepsy; I am not sure if you can do that” – have you heard this before? This blank statement usually comes from people who do not bother to ask you about your Epilepsy or do not listen to you but rather hear the term Epilepsy and revert to what they know. There is a lot of information out there, but from personal experience I noticed people tend to become fixated on the worst case scenario. They will avoid giving you a chance at something or inviting you somewhere because it avoids a potential risk. While yes, in some cases this is the best way to go, but unless the risk is involving your life being placed in harm’s way, then vouch for your right to have a chance. Educate them so they know how Epilepsy affects you. Step by step, this will help erase the stigma we face daily. That person may become inspired and tell three other people “did you know a person with Epilepsy can_____” Because we CAN and we WILL break these walls – give yourself a chance and others will follow.

Reassurance

While the idea of consoling someone older than you such as a parent or caregiver or consoling a friend on your condition may seem funny; they need reassurance just as much as you do. Some parents/caregivers may place the blame of Epilepsy on themselves or feel that it is their fault. They may feel that if they did something differently, you would not have to go through this journey. They may begin to harbor guilt which can manifest itself into arguments or unwanted distance. It may be beneficial to sit down and reassure them that this is not their fault – it is a random circumstance. Do not forget to remind them that no matter what, you appreciate what they do – they are going through a hard time right along with you. This can become emotionally overwhelming for you – as you may not understand why they are emotionally all over the place when YOU are the one going through Epilepsy in the literal sense. Do not forget they travel this road too as they watch every step you make.

Communication

Always keep a clear line of communication. Communicate your feelings, your concerns, and do not be afraid to ask them about how they feel or what their concerns may be. Sometimes this can be an emotional experience – you may hear things that upset you or you may not know how to react. This is okay. It is better to have things said and try to work through it as a team then harbor feelings of resentment, guilt, and/or fear which can add stress that is not needed. This can be therapeutic to both yourself and the other person.

Grievance and denial

This may be difficult to deal with when it comes to family – even peers. Some people may not believe you at first – this could be out of their own fear and/or wanting to avoid the situation. Some may truly not believe you and see it as “attention seeking” and more of a behavioral issue. One of the hardest things you will have to do, but yet one of the boldest and bravest, is to sit with these people and explain to them what is happening. I know it may sound cliché or redundant, but have a serious heart to heart, let them know how this makes you feel and ask them why they feel that way. This may be something that can be easily worked out or something that time itself may have to work out. Know that just like you, family and friends will go through a period of grievance that their loved one’s life will be changed and acknowledging that difficulties are going to come. It is hard to watch someone go through a condition like Epilepsy where they can feel helpless at times.

  • My perspective: I remember when my brothers had seizures – way before I developed Epilepsy myself. I remember standing there feeling like I could not do anything and with my elder, younger brother being essentially non-verbal – I wanted nothing more to experience what he did. Granted, I may have cursed myself at a young age but I wanted to help him and help others understand what he was going through. Family and friends will go through these emotions as well – they do not know what they should/can do. It is going to be part your job to help them along and educate them. This can be done either by giving them pamphlets, links to support groups and blogs, having them come to neurology appointments, or simply talking about your condition with them.

Loss of friends and distance of family members

While I wish I could say this will never happen, realistically it could and is something to be prepared for. Epilepsy is a lot to handle on your own – there will be times where you need help. Some people may have very mild cases and may not need the extra reliance. But for those of us who will – friends and family may not always be the most understanding. Once they go through the initial shock of the diagnosis – some may decide to make their distance. This can be an emotional time as well as close friends and family members may become non-existent. If talking to them and giving them some education on the topic does not help them cope; unfortunately, you cannot force them to stay and you should not have to. This acknowledgement can be hard to cope with but remember this; you do not need people like that in your life. If someone cannot accept you for both the good and bad – they do not deserve to be in your life. A true friend and real family will never walk out on you. They will never degrade you and they will never talk down to you. You DESERVE better than that. You WILL find new friends and new support – you may become closer to some people who were originally distant. With every person who walks out, a new person will walk in. You deserve nothing but the best; remember that.

  • Friends that leave and want to return: On occasion this may happen; a good friend might take a hiatus and come back into your life expecting you to welcome them with open arms after they left you at a low point. I will say that I cannot counsel you on what to do – this is a personal decision. What I will say and recommend is you have an open conversation without judgement and keep an open mind. Everyone copes differently. Perhaps they rethought their actions or maybe they came to a point of acceptance. It is hard and difficult decision to make; but everyone copes differently. It is entirely your choice to let this person back into your life and no one should ever judge you for the decision you make.

Strength, Courage, & Positivity

 Another subject that may sound rather silly but does help a lot is staying strong and courageous throughout your journey as well as keeping a positive attitude. While you should do these things for you own self-acceptance – it promotes social acceptance as well. When someone can see that you have a control on your feelings towards Epilepsy – it gives them comfort and gives them courage to take on this journey with you. No one else can experience Epilepsy the way you do and everyone will experience it differently. If you can take it on with a positive attitude; it will attract the masses and give them strength and courage to stand beside you as well as give them hope. As a family member, friend, or caregiver – it can be hard to stay positive at times; especially when you are witnessing low points of someone you love. But the positivity you have held all along will shine through another person when you cannot keep your head up on those low days. You will have encouraged and built a strong support system on pure strength, courage, and positivity.

Social Acceptance

While the journey may be tedious and may have to be restarted with every new social situation – it is worth every step. You will find out the strength of your support system, friends, family, and caretakers. You will begin to understand others better and on a different level than before. You will also meet new friends and extend your support system. Each day, you will begin to knock the walls down of the stigma that surrounds Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders. With every step you take, you are one step closer to not only helping yourself, but everyone around you and the Epilepsy and Seizure Disorder community as a whole. You are a warrior. You are a fighter. It may be tedious – but you will get to where you need be. Promise.


Never Let Anything Stop You

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Here are some of my accomplishments despite the stigma and despite Epilepsy

  • Top left: I got accepted into a Leadership program at my college
  • Middle Left: I was a volunteer at a pediatric oncology clinic and became camp counselor at a pediatric oncology camp
  • Bottom Left: I currently work at a local hospital
  • Middle: My little family – my two beautiful girls and loving partner
  • Top Right: I was inducted into Sigma Theta Tau International – a nursing honor society
  • Middle Right: My first love will always be music. This year I finally had time to get back into it with a help of a close friend. I currently play French Horn for a local Portuguese Band
  • Bottom Right: I am senior in a BSN program to become a RN

Share your thoughts and your accomplishments! Together, let us knock down the walls of stigma and become one step closer to social acceptance